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Thread: The Aith Gun

  1. #1
    Join Date
    April 2008
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    Default The Aith Gun


    Glad people liked the Vementry post.

    There are 2 other WW1 guns on Shetland, on the Isle of Bressay. These are a lot easier to get to as Bressay is populated and has a regular ferry service from Lerwick.

    We didnt get to the gun at Bard Head but we made it to the Northern gun at Scone Hill, Aith.

    Thats all from me, Happy Xmas

















    Magazine



    Gallows for hauling up ammunition and supplies






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    Thanks given by: ginger5092, Hugh Jorgan, Ipcre55, jindivik, krela, Mearing, night crawler, ocelot397, Old Wilco, oldscrote, SlimJim, smiler, TayTaySwifty, theartist, trainman

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    February 2015
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    Aberdeen, Scotland
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    Default


    That's interesting, amazing how these guns are still standing.
    When the going gets tough - the tough get going.

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  4. #3
    Join Date
    October 2010
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    Lost in Cornwall
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    Default


    Liked the third shot, lovely photography, Thanks
    Smiler
    😁

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  5. #4
    Join Date
    January 2013
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    Kent/West Pomerania, Poland
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    Default


    Mad ting. Ace to see some extant guns.
    Guntish Gent

    Pics 'n' Ting


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  6. #5
    Join Date
    January 2010
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    Default


    Another amazing gun. It's interesting to see that the actual gun barrel and breech mechanism have rusted far less than the lower quality steel used on the other parts.

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  7. #6
    Join Date
    February 2008
    Location
    Rawdon Leeds
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    Default


    The actual Interrupted Thread breech mechanism has long gone - removed and sent for scrap the day the Shetland guns were decommissioned. A major contributor to the longevity of large bore ordnance is the fact that the barrel blank went through a prolonged forging process, to give the outer shape, prior to the boring/rifling process. The forging reduced and compacted the grain size and thus reduced the pitting associated with the rusting process, and this along with the high metal spec for ordnance steels gives a much slower rusting process.

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