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  • B W T's Avatar
    Yesterday, 20:30
    Hunting Château by Broken Window Theory, on Flickr Clean mountain air, no noise and rural idyll - This village is a paradise for those who seek rest and relaxation. Or for those who seek derelict witnesses of the past! Over the scattered cabins in the valley the landmark of the community sits enthroned. As many other buildings here this one as well is abandoned and forgotten. And yet this former hunting château has a meaningful story. Because actually a royal family was living here at one...
    0 replies | 95 view(s)
  • B W T's Avatar
    Yesterday, 19:54
    Old Dairy by Broken Window Theory, on Flickr This is a place of cult for the German urbex community, called “Biosphere”. However, during the last years it has become noticeably quiet around the old country hostel and barely any photos get published nowadays. We had to hope that there was still a possibility to access the ramshackle hut. But actually, this was way easier than we thought it would be. Biosphere #02 by Broken Window Theory, on Flickr The most important thing was to buckle...
    0 replies | 105 view(s)
  • Dirus_Strictus's Avatar
    Yesterday, 15:43
    It's like that because of a very common practise at the time it was installed. Back at that time, constructional steel work was expensive and in short supply and it was common to cut deep RSJ's that had been reclaimed down the web, to produce T section joists for use in small area floors and roofs. All works well until one gets a major collapse of the roof and the weak joist bends under the weight of falling masonry and usually pulls free of the support walls. The style of the brick fireplace...
    3 replies | 206 view(s)
  • BikinGlynn's Avatar
    Yesterday, 13:28
    Blimey that is falling down. Nice to see a few bits left inside though, always worth a look!
    3 replies | 206 view(s)
  • Sausage's Avatar
    Yesterday, 13:20
    3rd last image: Those are some serious forces bearing down on that steel girder roof support! I see things like that in old mines not houses.. The house is far gone which is a shame. The fallen plaster will be hiding interesting bits. The lack of roof and subsequent water ingress means wallpapers are falling too. I recon that would have been a good cottage to find and photograph before the bad damage was done.
    3 replies | 206 view(s)
  • The_Derp_Lane's Avatar
    Yesterday, 13:09
    The other week, I found this secluded place down a remote lane not too far from me. It was visibly collapsed, so I wasn't expecting very much there. However, it turned out to be an atmospheric gem. Evidence in this cottage shows that the last owner was old, widowed and passed away around 1985. Going by the features that are left here, it may have been her childhood home. There was electricity, but no sign of running water to the property. The features in the remaining rooms speak for...
    3 replies | 206 view(s)
  • Dirus_Strictus's Avatar
    Yesterday, 10:16
    The asbestos cement sheeted agricultural shelter has nothing to do with with the original site - it is late '50's - early '60's and produced by one of three companies who started up again after WW11. As a point of interest asbestos sheeting was not used on buildings in WW11. Asbestos was a far too important commodity for that mundane use - unless the structure was special, and the supplies of it that survived the long wartime sea passages were used in gas protection, engineering insulation...
    13 replies | 478 view(s)
  • steviefry125's Avatar
    Yesterday, 09:30
    butchers boy ��
    13 replies | 478 view(s)
  • Sausage's Avatar
    Yesterday, 05:52
    Lol! I was going to say a frying pan. Dude(ette?) it tells you on my profile.
    13 replies | 478 view(s)
  • UrbandonedTeam's Avatar
    24th May 19, 19:26
    It seems like this year we are ending up in a lot of places we've known about for a long time, but have evaded us until now. This massive facility features some great ruined industry and a top notch control room. Winnington B/Brunner Mond Winnington is the home to Brunner Mond UK chemical works, where soda ash is created. Polythene, the material used in many plastic items (e.g. plastic bags), was first made at the chemical works by R.O. Gibson and E.W. Fawcett in 1933, during an...
    0 replies | 259 view(s)
  • krela's Avatar
    24th May 19, 18:53
    A pig, obvs.
    13 replies | 478 view(s)
  • steviefry125's Avatar
    24th May 19, 18:38
    sausage where abouts you from?
    13 replies | 478 view(s)
  • Sausage's Avatar
    24th May 19, 08:22
    Yup and it's making me wonder about other sites close to me here. I've probably not spotted them because of how they're hidden off to one side. I can think of two old airfields which need further investigation..
    13 replies | 478 view(s)
  • krela's Avatar
    24th May 19, 08:07
    There's lots of these dotted around the country, usually hidden in wooded areas. They were used extensively at domestic sites around ww2 airfields. I always think they look great, rusting away.
    13 replies | 478 view(s)
  • HughieD's Avatar
    24th May 19, 06:01
    Cheers mate. Just a shame I couldn't get up it! I don't think it is to be honest with you mate.
    13 replies | 478 view(s)
  • Sausage's Avatar
    23rd May 19, 21:36
    Easier by PM. PM sent.
    13 replies | 478 view(s)
  • wolfism's Avatar
    23rd May 19, 18:28
    That's cool, it looks like an old Braithwaite tank, made from identical steel pressings bolted together. Surprisingly the firm is still in business - Braithwaite Engineers Out of interest, whereabouts is it roughly, as I'm sometimes passing through the area?
    13 replies | 478 view(s)
  • BikinGlynn's Avatar
    23rd May 19, 17:38
    Lovely that nicely done!
    1 replies | 298 view(s)
  • UEP-Wales's Avatar
    23rd May 19, 14:22
    Tabor Congregational Chapel was first built in 1829. It was subsequently rebuilt in 1856 and again in 1876. The 1876 chapel was designed by architect Thomas Thomas of Landore and built in the classical style with gable-entry plan, two stories and a large arch in the facade. Tabor Chapel is now Grade 2 listed due to the good example of Thomas’s work with the Glorification Arch, unspoilt interior and unusual ironwork. Costing around £2000 to build, the Tabor Chapel now stands in a very poor...
    1 replies | 298 view(s)
  • steviefry125's Avatar
    23rd May 19, 07:17
    Love how it hasn't been destroyed by twats or councils,maybe more local authorities should take a leaf
    13 replies | 478 view(s)
  • Sausage's Avatar
    23rd May 19, 06:44
    You know those moments when your brain connects two places after the rusty gears have been stuck? Mine just did that! There's an almost identical tower near the old RAF Morpeth (Tranwell) airfield. The Tranwell one is basically two separate tanks with a narrow gap in the middle for access to the roof. For all these years I've known that the Tranwell tower is a private water supply for some nearby houses - I hadn't realised it was far older and from the airfield lol. Oh dear I slipped there! ...
    13 replies | 478 view(s)
  • BikinGlynn's Avatar
    23rd May 19, 05:55
    Very nice, the ladder shot is ace
    13 replies | 478 view(s)
  • HughieD's Avatar
    22nd May 19, 22:12
    1. The History RAF North Witham is a former World War II airfield in Lincolnshire, England. The airfield is located in Twyford Wood, off the A1 between Stamford and Grantham. It opened in 1943 and was used by both the RAF and US Army Air Forces. During the war it was used primarily as a transport airfield. It was allocated to the USAAF Troop Carrier Command in August 1943. Its immediate task was to distribute transport aircraft and the means of maintaining them to operational groups of the...
    13 replies | 478 view(s)
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DerelictPlaces is a forum for people with an interest in the history and documentation of disused, derelict and abandoned buildings to come together and share their experiences, photography and historical findings. Our military, industrial and historical heritage is fast disappearing under the pressure of regeneration, the need for new housing, and often through simple neglect; Our aim is to document these places before they disappear entirely.
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