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Thread: Eye Infirmary, Wolverhampton - August 2009

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2008
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    Arrow Eye Infirmary, Wolverhampton - August 2009


    Visited with Concentration F and LiamCH as part of our bank holiday midland urbex tour


    The original Infirmary was designed by the architect T H Fleeming (1849‑1935) whose works also include Barclays Bank, Lichfield Street (1876), the College of Adult Education, Old Hall Street (1899) and the late 19th century spire of St. Jude's Church, Tettenhall Road (itself built in 1867‑9), all of which are Grade II Statutorily Listed Buildings, and the former Higher Grade School, Newhampton Road which is on the Council's Local List.
    The Infirmary was built by Wolverhampton builders Henry Willcock & Co. at a cost of 13,000 and opened in 1888, providing three men's and three women's wards with thirty beds and five children's cots. A significant part of the cost was met by local philanthropist, Philip Horsman, who also donated the Art Gallery to the town and whose benefaction is commemorated in the Fountain in St. Peter's Gardens.
    It is constructed of red brick with elaborate brick details and stone dressings. It is built to an irregular plan in a simple Gothic style under a plain clay tiled roof with crested ridge tiles and two spired turrets, one of which has an inscribed stone plaque bearing the legend: 'EYE INFIRMARY AD 1887'. Some of the original sash windows have been replaced and late 20th century extensions to the original west front have detracted from the character and appearance of the original building.

    The local health care trust decided, in 2004, to close the Eye Infirmary, sooner rather than later, and move its services to somewhere else, unspecified and apparently unknown. These buildings are, therefore, at risk and sympathetic new uses need to be found for them. As the grounds in which they stand are now crowded and suffering from poor landscaping and neglect, any re-development should be treated as an opportunity to greatly improve the setting of these buildings.

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  3. #2
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    been wanting to go here for a bit thought it would be in worst condition than it is,looks well worth a trip be rude not to go

  4. #3
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    Default location


    hey.
    what is the location of this as really looks lke somewhere good to explore.
    jade

  5. #4
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    This is looking more and more trashed every time I see it. I really must get along before it gets utterly fucked over!!!!

    Sexyjade, try getting some posts on here before asking for blatant location/access details. You could be any old graffer/gypo after all!

  6. #5
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    the eye services were moved to the only remaining hospital in the city, New Cross.

    it was odd seeing the kids ward, i was a patient there!

  7. #6
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    You have got some excellent shots there Dove. Looks like an interesting explore!
    And a dreadful thing from the cliff did spring. And its wild bark thrilled around. His eyes had the glow of the fires below. Twas the form of the Spectre Hound. 'Ha' yer fa'r got a dickey, bor?' 'Yis, an' he want a fule ter roide 'im, will yew cum?'


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DerelictPlaces is a forum for people with an interest in the history and documentation of disused, derelict and abandoned buildings to come together and share their experiences, photography and historical findings. Our military, industrial and historical heritage is fast disappearing under the pressure of regeneration, the need for new housing, and often through simple neglect; Our aim is to document these places before they disappear entirely.
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