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Thread: Blackburn Royal Infirmary-Visited 2010

  1. #1
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    Arrow Blackburn Royal Infirmary-Visited April 2010


    Blackburn Royal Infirmary-Visited April 2010



    What's left of the Blackburn Royal Infirmary sits on an 8 acre site, costing 3200 in the latter part of the 19c. The foundation stone was laid in 1858 by william Pilkington. It was opened in 1865, in 1884 a new wing was added costing 4000. Then in 1901 due to the ever expanding population another was added, costing 1100 which commemorated Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee. In later years, a Nurses home , Children's ward and several other wings were added and it became an NHS hospital in 1948. In 2006 the entire site was decommissioned and about 80% of the Hospital has now been demolished, but what remains is a great example of Victorian red brick architecture with plenty of photographic gems inside.

























































    Last edited by dead pigeon; 9th Apr 10 at 16:29. Reason: added month
    "if all our prayers were answered, wishes would diminish"

  2. Thanks given by: bopit, Curlyben
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  4. #2
    Join Date
    April 2010
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    Oook
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    Default


    Eerie how some parts look like the occupants have just left, whereas others are really suffering.
    Great pics.

  5. #3
    Join Date
    April 2010
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    Red face


    Very well done sir, I was born in Blackburn 1955, I remember going home on the buss after getting a jag in the bum ( could not sit down Bad time's ) Good photo's...........FRANK.


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