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Thread: Cambridge Military Hospital (Exterior only)

  1. #1
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    Default Cambridge Military Hospital (Exterior only)


    I wasnt going to post these pictures up but this place is significant in the history of medical advancement in the UK and such a unique place.

    Here is some history that I have stolen from the internet:

    "Its birth was indirectly due to the influence of Florence Nightingale who after her experiences in the Crimean War (1854-1855) set about reforming the medical services of the Army through the influence she brought to bear on the Secretary of State for War, Lord Herbert. That demure exterior concealed the character of an inflexible and ruthless reformer.

    The Cambridge Hospital was built by Messrs Martin Wells and Co. of Aldershot at a cost of 45,758, and was opened for the admission of patients on Friday 18th July 1879. The hospital was named after HRH The Duke of Cambridge (1819 - 1904) who was the only son of the seventh son of HM George III. He was made a Field Marshall in 1862, and was Commander-in-Chief of the Army from 1856-1895.

    The Cambridge was probably the first base hospital in the history of the Army to receive casualties direct from the battle front. The battle of Mons took place on August 20th 1914.

    The Cambridge was also the birthplace of plastic surgery in the British Empire.

    Like many old buildings the Cambridge has its ghost. The "Grey Lady" is said to be a sister of Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service (now QARANC), who threw herself to her death from the open walkway between the upper wards, after she had mistakenly given a patient a fatal overdose of a prescribed drug. She is a benign ghost and is said to help the staff when under pressure with difficult cases.

    Sadly the disadvantages of the historic old building were used to support the closure of the hospital. Asbestos found in the walls and ceiling of the building was being removed as wards were refurbished two or three at a time, until work was halted by the proposed closure. Fire hazards prevented most of the upper floor being used, although fire standards had been improved. Many departments were cramped, and because the hospital was built on a hill for hygiene reasons, any outwards development was prevented. (It was originally thought that building it on a ridge would encourage clean air to waft through the wards.) The kitchens were said to need modernization to bring them up to food safety standards, and water was supplied through cast iron pipes which give it a yellow tinge."

    I know theres a lot there but I have picked out the important/relevant/interesting stuff that I had to share.

    On with the pictures, I apologise that they dont do the place justice at all.

    Admin Block:






    Oddly, there were some outbuildings of totally different construction:






    And some more traditional:




    Also an odd ambulance adaption? I know they will have had ambulances in the 40s and 50s but not when the hospital was built surely?





    Thanks for reading, I will return soon with pictures from inside the building!

  2. Thanks given by: Cuban B., MD
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  4. #2
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    Interesting, looks pretty immense, looking forward to the inside pics.
    Intrepid Insplorer - Boldly going where people have been before.

  5. #3
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    Yeah definately, unfortunately I was with mookster at the time and he wimped out!

  6. #4
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    Default Serendipity


    Quote Originally Posted by Zotez View Post

    The Cambridge was also the birthplace of plastic surgery in the British Empire.
    If any one is interested the surgeon was Harold Gillies who had a more well known cousin, Archibald McIndoe which ties in with East Grinstead and Rauceby. My neck of the woods, hows that for co-incidence?

  7. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zotez View Post
    Yeah definately, unfortunately I was with mookster at the time and he wimped out!
    Collective decision to not go inside I think you mean, as the guards were so nice to us letting us take externals
    My Flickr

    Pseudomerican

  8. #6
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    More like me being overruled!


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DerelictPlaces is a forum for people with an interest in the history and documentation of disused, derelict and abandoned buildings to come together and share their experiences, photography and historical findings. Our military, industrial and historical heritage is fast disappearing under the pressure of regeneration, the need for new housing, and often through simple neglect; Our aim is to document these places before they disappear entirely.
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