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Thread: Eye Infirmary Wolverhampton Jan 09

  1. #1
    Join Date
    February 2008
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    Birmingham
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    Default Eye Infirmary Wolverhampton Jan 09


    Well my first explore of 2009 did not start of to a great start. Met up with Flasher and Intrigued. Originally we was meant to visit Springfield Brewery but the normal access was now unaccessable.

    So we thought we would go back to the eye infirmary as I had not seen the operating theatres yet.



    Onto some history

    The Infirmary was built by Wolverhampton builders Henry Willcock & Co. at a cost of 13,000 and opened in 1888, providing three men's and three women's wards with thirty beds and five children's cots

    It is constructed of red brick with elaborate brick details and stone dressings. It is built to an irregular plan in a simple Gothic style under a plain clay tiled roof with crested ridge tiles and two spired turrets, one of which has an inscribed stone plaque bearing the legend: "EYE INFIRMARY AD 1887. Some of the original sash windows have been replaced and late 20th century extensions to the original west front have detracted from the character and appearance of the original building.























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  3. #2
    Join Date
    June 2009
    Location
    Blyth
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    32
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    Default


    hi there these are good photos i remember the building when it was still open i used to go there when i was about 4 i remeber the building really well it was picture 3 it was the waiting room and i also remember there were also 3 rocking horses in the middle of the room which i remeber playing on

    Sexy_Mamma
    Last edited by Sexy_Mamma; 24th Jun 09 at 20:07.


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DerelictPlaces is a forum for people with an interest in the history and documentation of disused, derelict and abandoned buildings to come together and share their experiences, photography and historical findings. Our military, industrial and historical heritage is fast disappearing under the pressure of regeneration, the need for new housing, and often through simple neglect; Our aim is to document these places before they disappear entirely.
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