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Thread: Shoreham Cement Works

  1. #1
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    Default Shoreham Cement Works






    No prizes for guessing where this is, or what they did here... the title kinda tells you!

    Incase you didnt get it from the ever cryptic title. This is Shoreham Cement Works... They made cement here.... It's in Shoreham


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/fieldym/3790926499/


    Shoreham-by-Sea is home to the largest Farmers' Market in Sussex and one of the largest in the South of England.
    It is held in East Street on the second Saturday of each month and usually has in excess of 60 stall holders.


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/fieldym/3791742884/


    The site stands in two halves spit by the A283.
    The western side was the main entrance to the site home to the distribution plant and the administrative blocks.
    To the east the industrial site and quarry.


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/fieldym/3790932921/


    There has been a limestone quarry on this site since 1851 and the end to production in 1991 marked the end of over 150 years of activity.
    The owners had no obligation to demolish the buildings or restore the landscape to its natural state, so production was simply stopped.
    This left the buildings as a well known local monument.


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/fieldym/3790922611/


    I know nothing about Cement production, so explaining what all this stuff did is not going to happen.

    Instead I will tell you about horses.

    The horse (Equus ferus caballus) is a hoofed (ungulate) mammal, a subspecies of one of seven extant species of the family Equidae.
    The horse has evolved over the past 45 to 55 million years from a small multi-toed creature into the large, single-toed animal of today.
    Humans began to domesticate horses around 4000 BC, and their domestication is believed to have been widespread by 3000 BC; by 2000 BC the use of domesticated horses had spread throughout the Eurasian continent.
    Although most horses today are domesticated, there are still endangered populations of the Przewalski's Horse, the only remaining true wild horse, as well as more common feral horses which live in the wild but are descended from domesticated ancestors.


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/fieldym/3791748972/


    Fieldy rocks your world!

    Last edited by FieldyM; 5th Aug 09 at 10:02.
    ME

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  3. #2
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    Thumbs up


    This looks EPIC!

    Well done Mr. Horse lover! :p;)
    Lb :jimlad:

    Think we're gonna need a bigger boat

    www.severallshospital.co.uk
    www.runwellhospital.co.uk

  4. #3
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    Pferde is Horse in German and they too have 4 legs.

    ps lovely pics fella,really nice,but not as nice as horse pics.

  5. #4
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    I'm confused Fieldy. Do they make cement out of horses? ;)

    Smashing pics mate. I'd spend a week in this place mooching around.

  6. #5
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    Good stuff Fieldy, if you read the sensible bits ;). Nice shots.

    Did you venture into any of the frontage or Silos? Was here recently and forgotten what a good site it was!
    Too Much Reasoning Kills Inspiration, Stone Dead

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    I havent had the pleasure of this site yet Mr Bones(hint)!

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by klempner69 View Post
    I havent had the pleasure of this site yet Mr Bones(hint)!
    Hint?

    Best invest in some hiking boots is all i can say!
    Too Much Reasoning Kills Inspiration, Stone Dead

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    Really nicely photographed Fieldy, and a stunning place too :)
    Links and shizz. - Flickr - UEXDBY

  10. #9
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    Thanks for the comments.

    Further pictures from Shoreham Cement Works, with no mention of Horses this time.

    Crap I mentioned Horses... Oh damn I did it again...


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/fieldym/3794580902/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/fieldym/3794583108/


    Its really difficult to get an idea of just how huge this site actually is from pictures.

    It really is a lovley site, well if you love exploring abandoned industry.

    Chances are you do, or an urbex website is a bit of a silly place to be.


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/fieldym/3794587406/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/fieldym/3793770687/


    Once again, Fieldy has rocked your world.

    ME

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  11. #10
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    Mr Bones my footware is more than capable of doing this place...wots wrong with my flipflops anyhow.Nice pics there of the horses Fieldy!

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