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Thread: Rank Hovis Clarence Mill Hull, Sept 09

  1. #1
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    Default Rank Hovis Clarence Mill Hull, Sept 09


    One of my long time "want to do" sites, visited with Chauffeur and UK Stormtrooper - a cracking explore.

    Clarence Mill was designed By Alfred Gelder and opened in 1891, it was driven by a triple expansion (whatever that was) steam engine which was one of the first applications of its type in a flour mill - real cutting edge technology!
    It was redesigned in May 1941 by the Luftwaffe, with the exception of the 41m high silos which they missed. The mill was rebuilt around the Victorian silos in 1952, it stands proudly beside the River Hull.

    Mill and silos:




    Clarence Mill operated until closure on Dec2nd 2005 with the loss of 30 jobs. Rank Hovis announced it would cost megabucks to update and anyway it would allow the developers to move in, demolish it and build a new 70m tower full of student apartments, restaurants and a casino.

    I've seen some great views of Hull lately, but these have to be the best; taken on a warm still morning waiting for the sun:

    Some well known buildings:





    Nee Nah:



    Mushroom:




    Inside it's like stepping back in time, lineshafts, pulleys and row upon row of wooden milling machines and flour dust everywhere.

    Silo tops:








    The mill floors are full of these amazing machines:













    Control panel:



    Screws:



    Finally the manlift - still operating in 2005!




    Thanks for looking!

  2. Thanks given by: silver surfer
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  4. #2
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    those manlifts look like deathtraps don't they!?


    Great set of pictures --


    And if you want to know about steam engines.....
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steam_e...ansion_engines

    fascinating beasts...
    Bostin...

  5. #3
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    those manlifts look like deathtraps don't they!?
    Indeed! - shows how far the health and safety regulations have come in 15yrs, there was a sign with a set of rules for its use dated dec92. Basically it was get on, don't take anything on it with you and hold on with both hands! Wonder what speed it ran at?

    Thanks for the link - I'm a lot more clued up about the expansion engine now; the animations are really good.

  6. #4
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    This place looks great, nice shots - are they from a few different trips or were you in there for quite a while?
    Too Much Reasoning Kills Inspiration, Stone Dead

  7. #5
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    Thanks Mr Bones,
    The pics were all from the same visit, started very very early and spent an enjoyable couple of hours on the top waiting for the sun. It meant that the mill shots were a bit more hurried than I would have liked and I didn't cover as much as I wanted. Hopefully I can get back there before any more of those wonderful wooden mills get stripped out.

  8. #6
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    Default man lifts


    years ago i fumigated the mill and had great fun on the man lift happy days

  9. #7
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    interesting place, great photos too!


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