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Thread: Penallta Colliery, Mid Glamorgan, South Wales - February 2010

  1. #1
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    Post Penallta Colliery, Mid Glamorgan, South Wales - February 2010


    Visited the site with Mendo, and came across Urban Warrior and Rach whilst in the bath house. Sorry for scaring the life out of you two. :)

    Some history of the site.

    The two shafts of Penallta colliery were sunk by the Powell Duffryn Steam Coal Company in 1905/6 who maintained ownership until Nationalisation in 1947. The first coal was raised in 1909 from the upper six feet seam and subsequently from the lower nine and seven feet seams.

    The number 1 shaft (downcast) and number 2 shaft (upcast) were 783 and 750 yards deep respectively were subsequently extended to reach 800 yards in 1960 making it the last deep mine working in the Rhymney Valley.

    Penallta colliery was maintained as one of the most advanced collieries using up-to-date coal cutting machinery. 1930 saw the production of 975,603 tons of coal and the European record for coal recovered in 1935. In the late 1940's the Meco-Moore Cutter Loader was installed, one of the first power loaders to be used in British mines helped produce the 500,000 tons of coal raised in 1954. The 1960 shaft extension scheme included electrification of the shaft winding engines. In the mid 1970's 700 men were producing 210,000 tons yearly.

    The 291 men employed in 1908 soon swelled to 1,920 in 1909. 1913 saw a slight reduction in the workforce to 1,281 men but in 1923, 2,395 men was employed which subsequently peaked at 3,208 men in 1931. 1947 saw a reduction to 1,934 men which reduced to a 700 men in the 1970’s.



    Despite an impressive return following the 1984/5 miners strike, Penallta colliery was scheduled for closure by British Coal in November 1990. The last shift led by a brass band left Penallta colliery on 01 November 1991 and the pit finally closed in 1992.

    (All information taken from http://www.hengoed.net/index.php?x=penallta )












    All that's left of one of the Conveyor Belts. :(



    And lastly from me, miner in the country park. :)


    1996 saw the regeneration of the Penallta colliery site. This project saw 180 hectares of derelict land transformed into a community park in which the subsequent enhancement programme enabled the completion of a programme of work that builds on previous activity carried out within Parc Penallta and increases the profile of the park.

    Much of the colliery site has been since been landscaped into the Penallta Community Park, but traces of its coal tips can still be seen along with the headgear of the two shafts which still stand proudly over the site as a constant reminder of its former life.

    Cheers,

    :) Sal

    PS. Mendo will be along at some point to add his pics to the report. :)
    GOOGLE is your friend :)

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    Thanks given by: simplesimon

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  3. #2
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    Looks good Sal, must get down to see this. :)
    ...Hear me now from the Invisible Opera Company of Tibet...

    Neolithicsea.co.uk

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    Nice report Sal..new one for me,so will have to add it to my list!

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    Absolutely love the Welsh mines. Excellent pics, Sal...love the first one especially, and the sillouettes. :)
    "...If we lose our spiritual bond with the land they'll be nothing left of us as a nation..." Phil Rickman.

    I can't read and I can't write, but that don't really matter,
    I come from the west country and I can drive a tractor.


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  6. #5
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    nice pics,cheers for sharing!i haven't been there in about ten years,is there still a big pile of tiles in the main building?-nice old fashioned green ones they were!although like i said,it has been ten years i'll be surprised if any were still there!

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  7. #6
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    Good to see the headstocks are still standing. :)

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  8. #7
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    there headgears :p like all proper south wales mines

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  9. #8
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    Sorry - noob error. Exile me to the orchards. ;)

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  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfism View Post
    ...Exile me to the orchards. ;)
    Hah! That just reminded me that I ought to finish that project! :p
    "...If we lose our spiritual bond with the land they'll be nothing left of us as a nation..." Phil Rickman.

    I can't read and I can't write, but that don't really matter,
    I come from the west country and I can drive a tractor.


    Website Story

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  11. #10
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    Always liked the look of this place Sal, will have to get myself down there soon

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