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Thread: EMI Treorchy, South Wales - Feb 2010.

  1. #1
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    Default EMI Treorchy, South Wales - Feb 2010.


    The former EMI factory in the upper Rhondda Valley was buillt around 1940 for the production of thermionic valves for aircraft radar sets. The company continued with MOD contracts including airborne, mobile and ground-based radar equipment, various other avionics and telecoms until the late 50's when it diversified into medical equipment and professional (ie. broadcast) A/V equipment. They were beaten hands-down by the Americans and the Japanese and by the mid 70's the plant was churning out thousands of blank cassette tapes - audio enthusiasts of a certain age may remember the cheap ferric oxide 'Emitape' brand blank tapes.

    By this time, the company had had several name changes and was known as Thorn-EMI-Dynatel. The cassette tape operation lasted a few years, again seen off by competition from the Far East, after which the company moved to contract electronics manufacture, which was really taking off in the area at that time. This lasted until the mid 80's when there was another change of name and a move to more modern premises. The empty building was rented for warehouse space.

    Soon after, a Christmas decoration company took over until they moved manufacturing to China on the late 90's. The factory has been disused since, and will always be known to the local community as the 'old EMI factory', because of its' significance in the area.

    Demolition is imminent, as apparently there are plans for yet another major supermarket. Part of the site has already gone, which used to house the old Ray-O-Vac (later Eveready) factory which made batteries and torches.

    So, what remains of this once-pioneering manufacturing premises? . . .








    This looked like a strores for the masterbatch (plastic material pigment), as the granules were everywhere.




    Contacters:






    Moving into the main production bay:




    Don't think so!


    Clock machine:






    Evidence of pikeyness, they just left the insulation.






    What's left of Reception:




    The remains of the old Ray-O-Vac battery factory:



    I really was pushed for time on this solo explore, so sorry about the quality of some of the pics. There's loads more to see, and I will be returning at some point and I'll tag on some more pics. I also have access to some old pics of the place ion its heyday, but don't want to infringe any copyright laws. Anyhow, thanks for looking.

    Some more pics here
    No signature due to chronic lack of imagination, creativity and wit.

  2. Thanks given by: pixilator, post-war
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  4. #2
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    i'm up that way soon, is it still there, and if so where to as ive never been up this way before..

  5. #3
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    Sorry we do not hand out that kind of info on a plate. Google is your friend.

  6. #4
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    lol i have been googling.. thats why i came here as google has like no info at all.. but nevermind il just take a look around and try to find it when i get up there..
    So much for this being a nice freindly helpful site!

  7. #5
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    We are very friendly to people who take the time to scope out how things work and try and fit in :)

  8. #6
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    Yes im sure you are bud. Sorry for not reading rules.. i now have :)


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DerelictPlaces is a forum for people with an interest in the history and documentation of disused, derelict and abandoned buildings to come together and share their experiences, photography and historical findings. Our military, industrial and historical heritage is fast disappearing under the pressure of regeneration, the need for new housing, and often through simple neglect; Our aim is to document these places before they disappear entirely.
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