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Thread: Spillers Mill, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, August 2010

  1. #1
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    Default Spillers Mill, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, August 2010


    Jumping on the bandwagon with this one. Visited with Vintage and a mate whos not on the forums.



    Bit of history….



    Spillers had come to Newcastle from Bridgewater in 1896 when they acquired Daudson's Phoenix Mill in The Close. In 1938 the new premises were completed, comprising of two main buildings: The Silo/Grain Store, built to accommodate up to 34k tons of grain, and The Flour Mill/Warehouse, which also contained an animal food mill. At the time of completion in 1938, the flour mill was the tallest flour milling building in the world.

    Was a very good explore, with excellent views from the roof, although it was a bit overcast so not as good as it could have been. The walkway at the top connecting the two buildings was a test of nerves, especially when looking back at it from outside!.












































































    Thanks for looking



    The rest are here
    Strangers passing in the street, by chance two separate glances meet, and I am you and what I see is me

  2. Thanks given by: garydancer, oddity
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  4. #2
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    Thumbs up


    Nice explore - thanks :)

  5. #3
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    Default


    Pics turned out good mate. Hopefully next time (if we do it again) we won't be disturbed by the pikeys


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