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Thread: Elijah Cotton (Nelson Pottery), Stoke on Trent - January 2014

  1. #1
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    Arrow Elijah Cotton (Nelson Pottery), Stoke on Trent - January 2014


    The company was first founded by Elijah Cotton in 1885, who built the present Nelson Pottery, on the site of an older one dating from 1785. The firm of Elijah Cotton Ltd was always identified with the manufacture of jugs, in the production of which they could undoubtedly claim to be specialists. In fact the firm's remarkable output of these more than justified their claim to be the largest manufacturers of jugs in the world. At their extensive works jugs of all sizes and shapes were made, from miniatures with a capacity of three fluid ounces to giants of ten pints. But jugs were by no means the only line produced by this successful and go-ahead concern. Its activities extend to the making of most kinds of earthenware, including tea and nursery wares and an extensive range of 'Fancies'. The factory seems to have closed in the early 1980's, after which the site was split up into various units.

    Was quite surprised to see this site still standing, it having been in an awful state for many years. I wasn't really feeling the place as its mega trashed, but while standing in a corridor spotted something interesting. Further investigation revealed a large stash of paperwork in a small roofspace, which alone made the visit worthwile! Visited with jacquesj.






























  2. Thanks given by: ajarb, caddygav, cunningplan, flyboys90, krela, Malcog, MrGruffy, mrtoby, oldscrote, perjury saint, smiler, tomcharcoal, tumble112
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  4. #2
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    Really good report, those receipts made fascinating reading. Nice 1o see a hillman hunter again too, my friends stepdad had a white gt, happy memories!

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    well done for finding that paperwork, made the report, I do like a good rummage in old paperwork!...nicely done cheers for posting
    'Reality is a collection of shadows cast upon the walls of a cave'. PLATO

    http://www.jameslaceyphotography.co.uk/

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    Nice one, I can feel a long-overdue return to Stoke on the cards to do this, Morrilew and JH Weatherby's.
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    Pseudomerican

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    What a great find thanks for sharing.

  8. #6
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    This looks rather nice!!
    YOU AINT SEEN ME... RIGHT!!

  9. #7
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    That’s really nice Goldie, I enjoyed it, Thanks
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DerelictPlaces is a forum for people with an interest in the history and documentation of disused, derelict and abandoned buildings to come together and share their experiences, photography and historical findings. Our military, industrial and historical heritage is fast disappearing under the pressure of regeneration, the need for new housing, and often through simple neglect; Our aim is to document these places before they disappear entirely.
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