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Thread: Bryn Brickworks. South Wales. Summer 2014

  1. #1
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    Default Bryn Brickworks. South Wales. Summer 2014


    This is a remarkable little oddity not far outside Maesteg. It's actually been listed as a very rare example of a 19th Century kiln brickworks, and it's listing entry on the Cadw database reads as follows.
    Bryn Brickworks was constructed after 1894 and continued production into the 1920s. The kiln block stood at the SE end of the works adjacent to a siding of the Port Talbot Railway. The clay preparation and drying sheds do not survive. The kilns are typical of a small brickworks of the late C19 or early C20 as they are intermittent, i.e. they were allowed to cool after firing, in contrast to continuous kilns, which had numerous chambers and where the heat was maintained. The kilns were linked with a pair of round chimney stacks, neither of which have survived, which demonstrates that they were of the downdraught type.

    More on the Port Talbot Railway anon,(more Welsh adventures for the Fluff and Godzy memory book) but in the mean time, on with the photos:



    The exterior looks pretty unremarkable, but the arching in the stoke holes (where the air was let in to stoke the fiire of the kiln) gives a small clue to what a marvellous building this must have been.

    brynbrick0052

    brynbrick0004

    brynbrick0046

    brynbrick0042

    Inside, the kiln Chambers are in varying states of repair, but you can still make out how they would have worked, drawing in air from outside

    brynbrick0006

    brynbrick0023

    We thought this bit might be for drying fired bricks, as it sits on the corner of the kiln chambers and doesn't take in any air other than the main entrance:

    brynbrick0024

    Lots of internal walls to partition the chambers as well as vents, which at one time led to two chimneys, neither of which is still standing unfortunately.

    brynbrick0032

    brynbrick0047

    And this big wide open entrance at one end, presumably for loading bricks on to the railway which went right past the front door:
    brynbrick0050

    A great little find all in all - not the sort of thing that usually crops up. We had a lengthy discussion about how much of the site is left under the acres of vegetation. Even the kiln block - smashing as it is inside - is disappearing under the weight of grass and brambles. A look at the aerial shot suggests there's quite a bit more under the surface:

    Any thoughts very welcome
    Godzy
    "You never planned on the bombs in the sand/Or sleeping in your dress blues."

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  4. #2
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    A well hidden treasure! Looks like a winter visit might uncover more?

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    Some fantastic brickwork arch porn there. Great report. Thanks for sharing.

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    wow, what a great find and some amazing history. Shame places like this don't remain enact, I bet it was quite a hive of activity when it was running, would be great to see it in its original form!

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    That's a nice discovery and really interesting,thanks for showing.

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    Ummmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm brick porn, lovin this mate.

    Cheers Newage
    The Newage Traveller gaining entry so you don`t have to.....

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    Nice one Godzy old boy !! Like we said at the time, the way to do this baby justice would be to return at night for some serious wrist action - waving the torch about i mean !!:)

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    Thumbs up


    Cool find Godzy, well done for battling those brambles, really like the look of this one!
    Aversos Compono Animos

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    Thanks for all the comments guys. Would love to go back at night for more of this!
    "You never planned on the bombs in the sand/Or sleeping in your dress blues."

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