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Thread: Bole Hill Millstone Quarry, Derbyshire, November 2015

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    Default Bole Hill Millstone Quarry, Derbyshire, November 2015


    Have been wondering whether to post this one or not as it’s a bit different and pushing the boundaries of “Derelict Places”. But I guess it is a place that is derelict so thought I’d take a punt. The place in question is Bole Hill Millstone Quarry just outside Hathersage and Upper Padley, above Grindleford Station in Derbyshire. Hundreds of old millstone-grit mill-stones lay abandoned, some stacked neatly – some strewn around, and most with lots of thick green moss on them.

    I’ve found a bit of history on the place. The quarry was originally chosen for the quality of the rock. Millstones, grindstones and crushing stones were made here for over 600 years. In medieval times the local stone was used for millstones for grinding flour but then when the move to white bread came, grit-stone was seen as being no good as it made the flour gray. From then on the stones were used for industrial grinding. However the industry collapsed due to cheaper foreign imports (from France) and this forced a disastrous slump in trade. The quarry was almost abandoned overnight and the pulp-stones we see here were left in-situ. They were due to be exported to Scandinavia for use in crushing wood into pulp for the paper industry . There would have been some wooden structures at the quarry but these have long rotted away.

    Didn’t really know whether to post this in ‘Industrial’ or ‘Rural’ but went for rural in the end. Either way, it’s a pretty magical place so I hope you like the pictures.

    img2690 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    img2689 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    img2685 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    img2683 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    img2680 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    img2676 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    img2663 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    img2662 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    img2661 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    img2652 by HughieDW, on Flickr



    img2651 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    img2648 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    img2691 by HughieDW, on Flickr
    Last edited by HughieD; 4th Nov 15 at 01:06.

  2. Thanks given by: flyboys90, Malcog, Mearing, Mikeymutt, oldscrote, rockfordstone, Rubex, smiler, theartist, The_Derp_Lane, tumble112, zanderoy
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  4. #2
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    Interesting, I love how nature is reclaiming it back. Thanks for sharing. :)

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    Quote Originally Posted by dauntless - UE View Post
    Interesting, I love how nature is reclaiming it back. Thanks for sharing. :)
    Pleasure mate...

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    Great pics! Thanks for posting.
    I think this must be the same Bole Hill Quarry which provided the stone for the Derwent and Howden dams. If so, did you see any sign of the railway incline which led up to the quarry from the sidings to the west of Grindleford station? The book "Walls across the Valley" about the construction of the Upper Derwent Valley reservoirs has a chapter about Bole Hill Quarry with several photographs. Looks like a quite a big site. It says the incline is largely overgrown but can be readily located, especially the upper half and the lower end where it passes under the lane at Upper Padley. Grid reference: SK246790

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    I didn't know millstones came in a standard size !
    ps Use steel cap boots when putting into boot. And do not roll anywhere - they may break.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nanook View Post
    ps Use steel cap boots when putting into boot. And do not roll anywhere - they may break.
    What do you mean putting into boot? That would be theft. Better to leave them in place for everyone to see.

    Sent from my SM-G925F using Tapatalk

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    Abandoned industry definitely fits the bill so I'm glad you posted this Hughie. :)

    Think it fits industry better though so I'll move it there.

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    Coming to a garden centre near you, great pics Hughie, Thanks
    Smiler
    😁

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    Quote Originally Posted by abanazar View Post
    Great pics! Thanks for posting.
    I think this must be the same Bole Hill Quarry which provided the stone for the Derwent and Howden dams. If so, did you see any sign of the railway incline which led up to the quarry from the sidings to the west of Grindleford station? The book "Walls across the Valley" about the construction of the Upper Derwent Valley reservoirs has a chapter about Bole Hill Quarry with several photographs. Looks like a quite a big site. It says the incline is largely overgrown but can be readily located, especially the upper half and the lower end where it passes under the lane at Upper Padley. Grid reference: SK246790
    Yes...you're a man in the know! It is the very same quarry where the stones for the dams came from. RE: the incline I think this is what you are referring to:



    Not too sure I came across this on my walk. I have seen pictures of the remains of the winding drum pictured below though:



    Quote Originally Posted by krela View Post
    Abandoned industry definitely fits the bill so I'm glad you posted this Hughie. :)

    Think it fits industry better though so I'll move it there.
    Many thanks Krela!

    Quote Originally Posted by smiler View Post
    Coming to a garden centre near you, great pics Hughie, Thanks
    Think someone would have half-inched them already if they were moveable!

    Quote Originally Posted by nanook View Post
    I didn't know millstones came in a standard size !
    ps Use steel cap boots when putting into boot. And do not roll anywhere - they may break.
    These were all part of a job lot order bound for Scandinavia (pulp stones to be more precise) which would explain their standard dimensions.

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    " What do you mean putting into boot? That would be theft. Better to leave them in place for everyone to see."

    Ha Ha - I forgot to add you'll need a tow truck & 5 assistants ! There's a weighty reason they haven't moved far.

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