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Thread: RAF Dry Tree Chain Home Radar Station (Pic Heavy)

  1. #1
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    Default RAF Dry Tree Chain Home Radar Station (Pic Heavy)


    I always like it when disappointment turns to enjoyment. So a day at RNAS Culdrose was on the cards until I got there and they were digging up the runway. Disappointed to say the least so what to do ? A drive out to the Lizard past Goonhilly. But what is that in the field ? Military building remains so an explore is on the cards. The notice board tells me this is the site of RAF Dry Tree. Never heard of it so time to take a look. After three hours wandering about this turned into a rather good day. Quite a lot left to be seen plus a bunker that is not listed on the info board for the site.

    RAF Dry Tree was a Chain Home Radar Station constructed in 1940 to detect aircraft approaching South Cornwall and the Western Approaches. The site had four 110m transmitter masts and two 73m wooden receiver towers.

    Many attacks came at night and these were detected by Dry Tree and Trelanvean who in turn sent intercepting Beaufighters and Mosquito’s from nearby RAF Predannack. Predannack is located near and is visible from the site on the horizon.

    There were about 120 personnel located at the site with half of them being women of the WAAF. It was not until August 1945 that the Air Ministry finally admitted the existence of the up until then secret radar stations.

    If you go to this site beware the adders that are in the undergrowth as they are abundant along with the odd scurrying lizard. The shots were taken in April 2011.

    Receiver Standby Facility - remains



    Evidence of a previous existance



    Entrance to one of the remaining air raid shelters



    Internal air raid shelter view



    Identification Friend Or Foe (IFF) Building - IFF was used to determine if an aircraft was friendly or enemy. IFF equipment
    would interogate an aircraft and if it was carrying a transponder the aircraft would identify itself as friendly. Enemy aircraft would
    not carry the required transponder to respond and therefore would be classed as hostile. As the war progressed so did the art
    of nightfighting and interception on both sides. Darkness was no longer somewhere to hide and many aircraft were intercepted and shot
    down over the UK and Europe due the combined efforts of ground control and nightfighters. One of the of the more sinister events was the onset
    of night intruders which would wait at returning bomber airfields and shot down aircraft as they came into land. Both the allies and the axis powers used
    these tactics succesfully as the war went on. It must have been very demoralising for crews to be within sight of their home airfield only to be shot down
    at the missions end.



    One of the five remaining Receiver Tower bases



    This brick structure was at the centre of the Receiver Tower



    Within the brickwork is located this base



    Switchgear remains



    Unidentified building



    View from the Receiver Room roof - IFF building in the foreground



    Internal view of the Receiver Room



    Located in a clump of trees is a well hidden bunker. There is no detail as to what the buildings purpose was.
    When I approached the building I heard voices from inside. With a little trepidation I went inside and someone said hello "are you the batman". I said no just taking photo's.
    Transpired the people in the bunker were making a horror film. Very good location I would say.



    The remains of air conditioning plant - the large box like structure is an air filteration unit



    Air conditioning control cubicle



    Fan units former location



    The makers name



    Damper control detail



    Fan motor housing at ductwork inlet - outlet ?



    Ductwork detail



    Water now floods the bunkers lower working areas





    Electrical conduit remains



    Switchgear remains



    Derelict racking



    Air conditioning outlet - I assume the site would work under negative pressure to protect in the event of gas attack



    General internal view



    Air conditioning ductwork dog leg



    Flat fields surround the site. These mounds were constructed to deter enemy gliders from landing in the
    event of invasion



    One more unidentified building



    There are other buildings located within the site but are in deep foliage. With the risk of adders I did not venture in !!

    Thanks for looking.
    Last edited by hydealfred; 13th Apr 11 at 08:17. Reason: Blame the IT !!

  2. Thanks given by: Ace5150, Curious Dragon, Grockle, helzbelz, John_D, muppet, night crawler, oldscrote, RichCooper, Scaramanger, smileysal, sYnc_below, the mob killa, tigger2, zEro101
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  4. #2
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    Great explore, sometimes the unplanned ones turn out to be the best.
    Are you a little bit curious what would have happened if you said you were Batman? Could have been interesting

    RAF Dry Tree is a new one to me too... bit of an odd name too. Would love to go have a look at this myself.
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    The past is never forgotten, sometimes it just lies dormant waiting for the right moment

  5. #3
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    If I had said I was the batman they may have asked to star in the film :) Might have been a bit scary though !!

    It is an interesting place and well worth a look. I'd never heard of it and theres not much on the web about it either.

  6. #4
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    That site is very near the Rotor Radar bunker at Treleaver which I discovered and explored over 50 years ago, shortly after it was abandoned, there were still 'Walls have Ears' type posters on the walls, sorry no pictures :( Was only able to explore the upper level as the lower level was flooded.

  7. Thanks given by: hydealfred
  8. #5
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    LOL at "hello are you the batman?", unfortunately I have an inkling as to who that may have been (I know people currently in the area like that). That's an awesome place.
    Tell me about the dream where we pull the bodies out of the lake and dress them in warm clothes again. How it was late, and no one could sleep, the horses running until they forget that they are horses.

  9. Thanks given by: hydealfred
  10. #6
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    Oh, come on!!! What's happened to your Photobucket account??? Get the pics back up.
    Do it safely, or not at all.

  11. #7
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    Photobucket are having to do some emergency unscheduled maintenace so that might be the cause.
    My Flickr

    The past is never forgotten, sometimes it just lies dormant waiting for the right moment

  12. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seahorse View Post
    Oh, come on!!! What's happened to your Photobucket account??? Get the pics back up.
    Normal service has now been resumed - I would like to blame the IT but I think it was me that caused all the shots to vanish :p

  13. #9
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    Hooray!!! :)
    Do it safely, or not at all.

  14. #10
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    Very nice now the piccies are back, loving the Air Room :)

  15. Thanks given by: hydealfred
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