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Thread: Bletchley Park

  1. #1
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    Default Bletchley Park


    History

    The site appears in the Domesday Book as part of the Manor of Eaton. Browne Willis built a mansion there in 1711, but after Thomas Harrison purchased the property in 1793 this was pulled down. It was first known as Bletchley Park after its purchase by Samuel Lipscomb Seckham in 1877. The estate of 581 acres (235 ha) was bought in 1883 by Sir Herbert Samuel Leon, who expanded the then-existing farmhouse into what architect Landis Gores called a "maudlin and monstrous pile" combining Victorian Gothic, Tudor, and Dutch Baroque styles.

    In 1938, the mansion and much of the site was bought by a builder planning a housing estate, but in May 1938 Admiral Sir Hugh Sinclair, head of the Secret Intelligence Service (SIS or MI6), bought the mansion and 58 acres (23 ha) of land for 6,000, using his own money after the Government said they did not have the budget to do so, for use by GC&CS and SIS in the event of war.

    A key advantage seen by Sinclair and his colleagues (inspecting the site under the cover of "Captain Ridley's shooting party") was Bletchley's geographical centrality. It was almost immediately adjacent to Bletchley railway station, where the "Varsity Line" between Oxford and Cambridge whose universities were expected to supply many of the code-breakers met the main West Coast railway line connecting London, Birmingham, Manchester, Liverpool, Glasgow and Edinburgh. Watling Street, the main road linking London to the north-west (subsequently the A5) was close by, and high-volume communication links were available at the telegraph and telephone repeater station in nearby Fenny Stratford.

    Bletchley Park was known as "B.P." to those who worked there. "Station X" (X = Roman numeral ten), "London Signals Intelligence Centre", and "Government Communications Headquarters" were all cover names used during the war. The formal posting of the many "Wrens" members of the Women's Royal Naval Service working there, was to HMS Pembroke V. Royal Air Force names of Bletchley Park and its outstations included RAF Eastcote, RAF Lime Grove and RAF Church Green. The postal address that staff had to use was "Room 47, Foreign Office".

    After the war, the Government Code & Cypher School became the Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) moving to Eastcote in 1946 and to Cheltenham in the 1950s. The site was used by various government agencies, including the GPO and the Civil Aviation Authority. One large building, block F was demolished in 1987 by which time the site was being run down with tenants leaving. In 1990 the site was at risk of being sold for housing development. However, Milton Keynes Council made it into a conservation area. Bletchley Park Trust was set up in 1991 by a group of people who recognised the site's importance.


    Blocks

    In addition to the wooden huts, there were a number of brick-built "blocks".

    Block A: Naval Intelligence.
    Block B: Italian Air and Naval, and Japanese code breaking.
    Block C: Stored the substantial punch-card index.
    Block D: Enigma work, extending that in huts 3, 6, and 8.
    Block E: Incoming and outgoing Radio Transmission and TypeX.
    Block F: Included the Newmanry and Testery, and Japanese Military Air Section. It has since been demolished.
    Block G: Traffic analysis and deception operations.
    Block H: Tunny and Colossus (now The National Museum of Computing).


    Unfortunately i didn't get access to some of the other blocks! But hope you still enjoy!











































  2. Thanks given by: ajarb, etc100, ExplorerX, jmcjnr, Mearing, mookster, psykie, rockfordstone, Rubex, Sausage, Sludden, stu8fish, theartist, Tigershark
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  4. #2
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    Default


    Real history there.

    Thanks

  5. Thanks given by: Rolfey
  6. #3
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    A good history write-up but a pity you didn't go further. I found a BBC video all about Bletchley Park and its codebreakers. It's about an hour long but worth the watch as you've been there.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xnr4pM-ntdc
    When the going gets tough - the tough get going.

  7. Thanks given by: Rolfey
  8. #4
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    the site is being sanitised now, saw it before and after, the atmosphere of the place is non exhistant now.

  9. Thanks given by: Rolfey
  10. #5
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    You got some nice shots, I liked it, Thanks
    Smiler
    😁

  11. Thanks given by: Rolfey
  12. #6
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    Thank you smiler even thought the state was in was nice to go and still experience it some nice decay in there as well!

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