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Thread: Folly Cheshire Oct 2010

  1. #1
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    Default Folly Cheshire Oct 2010


    Was unable to find out anything about the folly other than it was built as part of the estate to a large Victorian house ,whose history i have included below.

    Construction started in the early 1860s on instruction by Rev. Richard Greenall, who was a local Rural Dean. He died (1867) before the building was complete and the first owner was a leather merchant from Liverpool called James Reynolds. A succession of four more families resided here until in 1960, it was sold to Dr. Lawrence Pilkington (from renowned glass family) and his wife Norah. When their daughters moved away, the House was too large for the two of them, and they bequeathed it to Chester Diocese in 1969.

    Accompanied by "chimps"











    "Folly" seemed quite apt as when taking much easier route out, stumbled upon what i was convinced was a WW2 searchlight emplacement. After consulting Google earth and WW2 overlay (cheers Cptpies) it turned out to be nothing of the sort!



    Thanks for looking.

  2. Thanks given by: Foxylady, RichardH
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  4. #2
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    Odd looking folly mate, what's with the vicious looking ironmongery around the roof

  5. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldscrote View Post
    Odd looking folly mate, what's with the vicious looking ironmongery around the roof
    Think its to prevent people climbing onto top, masonry up there looks a little damaged and liable to come down. Did wonder myself if period, as folly is on private land and off the beaten track :)


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