Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Ecton Hall "The Gazebo" & the cottage

  1. #1
    Join Date
    June 2014
    Posts
    1,111
    Thanked
    1836

    Default Ecton Hall "The Gazebo" & the cottage


    When u think you know your local area & something like this pops up. It has been covered before but some years ago so dont quite know how Iv missed it for so long.
    There is very little other pics on the net so here goes.

    IMG_3178 by Bikin Glynn, on Flickr

    The first recorded owner of the main manor, in the Domesday survey, was Bondi; he was succeeded by Henry de Ferrers, who also owned the nearby manors of Earls Barton (his chief manor), Great Doddington, Wilby and Mears Ashby. Ownership descended through the Duchy of Lancaster to the Montgomery family who held it until 1574.
    The estate was sold for only the second time since the doomsday records to Thomas Isted in 1712 & it was his son
    Ambrose who would inherit the estate in 1731 & spend the next 50 nor so years making massive alterations, purchasing large parts of the village, flattening them & re routing roads to suit his needs.
    It is believed to be Ambrose who built the gazebo.
    new build apartments have been built behind the hall now segregating it from what was once a fantastic landscaped garden which is evident by the redwoods entwined in amongst more natural species.

    The first thing you come across is what I think is a woodcutters cottage / mill although I cant find any info on this building.

    IMG_3138 by Bikin Glynn, on Flickr


    IMG_3149 by Bikin Glynn, on Flickr


    IMG_3274 by Bikin Glynn, on Flickr

    There was a lot of roof tiles laying around here, & some matching pattern glass ones which I have never seen before!

    IMG_3283 by Bikin Glynn, on Flickr

    Original garden gate is looking very bizarre in a overgrown small woodland.

    IMG_3260 by Bikin Glynn, on Flickr




    The gazebo then looms into view

    IMG_3251 by Bikin Glynn, on Flickr


    IMG_3188 by Bikin Glynn, on Flickr


    The table was seemingly carved from a solid piece of stone

    IMG_3184 by Bikin Glynn, on Flickr


    IMG_3198 by Bikin Glynn, on Flickr


    IMG_3207 by Bikin Glynn, on Flickr


    IMG_3215 by Bikin Glynn, on Flickr


    Loved the curved door into the higher room

    IMG_3244 by Bikin Glynn, on Flickr


    IMG_3228 by Bikin Glynn, on Flickr


    IMG_3236 by Bikin Glynn, on Flickr


    IMG_3253 by Bikin Glynn, on Flickr

    Thats all for now, thanks for looking!
    Last edited by BikinGlynn; 28th May 19 at 20:58.
    What the hell am I doing, I mean really at my age!

  2. Thanks given by: etc100, Hugh Jorgan, krela, Mearing, Mikeymutt, Missymoo16, noiseboy72, Old Wilco, paul.richards.up, Sausage, Sidsdx1988, stu8fish, Terminal Decline, theartist, thorfrun
  3.  
     
  4. #2
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    29
    Thanked
    21

    Default


    Stunning building, I hope it will be cared for.

  5. Thanks given by: BikinGlynn
  6. #3
    Join Date
    June 2014
    Posts
    1,111
    Thanked
    1836

    Default


    Quote Originally Posted by Old Wilco View Post
    Stunning building, I hope it will be cared for.
    Yeah strange it seems very un cared for tbh but it is listed so hopefully nothing nasty will happen to it!
    What the hell am I doing, I mean really at my age!

  7. #4
    Join Date
    April 2008
    Location
    Northumberland
    Age
    53
    Posts
    1,430
    Thanked
    203

    Default


    Cute little building that.
    I can't help but think of a use for that upstairs room. Perhaps for 'courting' or even as a loo. It does have frosted glass and shelves for books after all!

    Along the banks of the Tyne just upstream from the bridges you'll find signs of early large gardens. Sections of fence and mature bushes adorn their edges.
    Full of meaty goodness.

  8. Thanks given by: BikinGlynn
  9. #5
    Join Date
    February 2008
    Location
    Rawdon Leeds
    Age
    75
    Posts
    1,781
    Thanked
    1557

    Default


    [QUOTE=Sausage;360079]I can't help but think of a use for that upstairs room. Perhaps for 'courting' or even as a loo. It does have frosted glass and shelves for books after all!

    'Frosted glass' - Oh dear! Read the images, it is just good old fashioned country dirt. Years ago when I first stumbled upon this place, the windows were regularly cleaned; however the need to put up mesh anti vandal screens at each window makes this impossible now. If the weather turned clement whilst the Ladies and Gents of the Manor were out walking, the ladies would retire upstairs for a read and the gents would sit downstairs and have a natter and a smoke. Whilst the poor peasants continued to cut wood in the downpour. The Day Books, kept by the Stewards of some of these large Estates make make interesting, but rather uncomfortable reading in this day and age.

    The glass pantile roof light is very common in its usual present day form - broken shards of glass lying under the debris of the collapsed roof of a derelict building. Your cottage as you surmise was the 'wood cutters, forest workers house from the records I have seen. He had a huge acreage to keep, cultivate and manage. The harvested timber brought in a very large income!

  10. Thanks given by: BikinGlynn
  11. #6
    Join Date
    June 2014
    Posts
    1,111
    Thanked
    1836

    Default


    [QUOTE=Dirus_Strictus;360083]
    Quote Originally Posted by Sausage View Post
    I can't help but think of a use for that upstairs room. Perhaps for 'courting' or even as a loo. It does have frosted glass and shelves for books after all!

    'Frosted glass' - Oh dear! Read the images, it is just good old fashioned country dirt. Years ago when I first stumbled upon this place, the windows were regularly cleaned; however the need to put up mesh anti vandal screens at each window makes this impossible now. If the weather turned clement whilst the Ladies and Gents of the Manor were out walking, the ladies would retire upstairs for a read and the gents would sit downstairs and have a natter and a smoke. Whilst the poor peasants continued to cut wood in the downpour. The Day Books, kept by the Stewards of some of these large Estates make make interesting, but rather uncomfortable reading in this day and age.

    The glass pantile roof light is very common in its usual present day form - broken shards of glass lying under the debris of the collapsed roof of a derelict building. Your cottage as you surmise was the 'wood cutters, forest workers house from the records I have seen. He had a huge acreage to keep, cultivate and manage. The harvested timber brought in a very large income!

    Nice one Dirus, ye of all knowledge, thanks for the info
    What the hell am I doing, I mean really at my age!

  12. #7
    Join Date
    October 2013
    Posts
    3,069
    Thanked
    11563

    Default


    Thats such a super find..so full off character but quaint
    I like to go where others fear to tread.

  13. Thanks given by: BikinGlynn

Similar Threads

  1. The "Candymans" Cottage - July 2017
    By mockingbird in forum Rural Sites
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 10th Jul 17, 15:28
  2. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 1st Mar 17, 19:29
  3. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 15th Dec 13, 08:46
  4. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 15th Dec 13, 08:43
  5. Site "Y" - South Wales, April 2012 (Lots of Pics)
    By UEP-Wales in forum Hospitals & Asylums
    Replies: 46
    Last Post: 9th Jul 12, 20:29

About us
DerelictPlaces is a forum for people with an interest in the history and documentation of disused, derelict and abandoned buildings to come together and share their experiences, photography and historical findings. Our military, industrial and historical heritage is fast disappearing under the pressure of regeneration, the need for new housing, and often through simple neglect; Our aim is to document these places before they disappear entirely.
Follow us