Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Old colonial houses, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, January 2018

  1. #1
    Join Date
    January 2013
    Location
    People's Republic of South Yorkshire.
    Posts
    3,823
    Thanked
    7200

    Default Old colonial houses, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, January 2018


    1. The History
    This row of eight old colonial houses face the busy Jalan Raja Chulan (formerly known as Weld Road) in the Bukit Nanas area of KL. Built in 1930, it was originally called the Serani Row. An elaborate crest on the wall bears the initials OES and the date of completion recorded as 1931.

    They have seen better days as the houses now vary in states of repair, from completely derelict on the left-hand side to moderately good nick on the right-hand-side. The six in-between houses vary from abandoned to just-about-habitable. In their day they probably represented the very best and elite accommodation in the city and formerly home to a Eurasian community.

    2. The Visit
    Things move fast in KL. My intended revisit round the corner was scuppered as the bulldozers had obliterated this lovely corner of KL. When I came round the corner I saw they had erected the same high blue corrugated wall around these lovely buildings. But they were still there plus you could just go round the wall. So off I tootled.

    3. The Pictures

    img5014 by HughieDW, on Flickr



    That famous bit of graff:

    img5013 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    img5012 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    …and some other graph:

    img5011 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    img5010 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    The first house is just a shell:

    img4986 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    img4985 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    This place is in the second worst nick:

    img5005 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    img4993 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    Inside the second-worst conditioned house:

    img5007 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    img5006 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    The gate for next door:

    img4995 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    img5003 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    This place is in better nick:

    img5004 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    2018-01-12_07-33-56 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    Rubbish, including human excrement abounds:

    img4999 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    The tiles that can be found on the front of all houses are a joy:

    img4992 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    Looking along the row:

    img5002 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    img5000bw by HughieDW, on Flickr

    And the OES crest, which, despite much research, still remains a mystery:

    img4989 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    img4988 by HughieDW, on Flickr
    Last edited by HughieD; 13th Jan 18 at 00:02.

    ----------
    Thanks given by: Hugh Jorgan, jsp77, krela, Mearing, psykie, smiler, thorfrun, Tigershark

  2.  
     
  3. #2
    Join Date
    February 2015
    Location
    Aberdeen, Scotland
    Age
    60
    Posts
    1,978
    Thanked
    1307

    Default


    Ah, so they have not been bulldozed, maybe they are being kept. Nice titles or did you mean nice tiles, which is what I agree. I think I've discussed the crest OES in a previous post and the only information I can find is the Order of the Eastern Star (a branch of Freemasons). But obviously it is not but I drew a blank, all I can think of is the house was built in 1931 and the family's surname had the initials OES.
    When the going gets tough - the tough get going.

    ----------
    Thanks given by: HughieD

  4. #3
    Join Date
    January 2013
    Location
    People's Republic of South Yorkshire.
    Posts
    3,823
    Thanked
    7200

    Default


    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh Jorgan View Post
    Ah, so they have not been bulldozed, maybe they are being kept. Nice titles or did you mean nice tiles, which is what I agree. I think I've discussed the crest OES in a previous post and the only information I can find is the Order of the Eastern Star (a branch of Freemasons). But obviously it is not but I drew a blank, all I can think of is the house was built in 1931 and the family's surname had the initials OES.
    Oops! Yes. My bad as the kids say. Tiles it was meant to be. And yes Hugh. I remember back now and in the absence of any other info I think you may be right. Let's hope they do get saved. Think there are some issues as to who the owners of some of the houses are but let's hope they can get round this. KL does not have a good record with saving its architectural heritage though I'm afraid. Land like this is worth so much more developed.

    ----------
    Thanks given by: Hugh Jorgan

  5. #4
    Join Date
    October 2010
    Location
    Lost in Cornwall
    Posts
    4,369
    Thanked
    3108

    Default


    There are some nice features remaining and it would be a loss if it is destroyed, however folks need house's so understanable if they demolish and rebuild, another good report Hughie, Thanks
    Smiler
    😁

    ----------
    Thanks given by: HughieD

  6. #5
    Join Date
    January 2013
    Location
    People's Republic of South Yorkshire.
    Posts
    3,823
    Thanked
    7200

    Default


    Quote Originally Posted by smiler View Post
    There are some nice features remaining and it would be a loss if it is destroyed, however folks need house's so understanable if they demolish and rebuild, another good report Hughie, Thanks
    Cheers Smiler. Hope they do get saved. I'll give you an up-date in a years time!

    ----------

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 11th Jan 18, 23:32
  2. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 28th Jan 17, 19:30
  3. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 23rd Jan 17, 18:49
  4. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 18th Jan 17, 18:02
  5. The Stilt Hall, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, January 2015
    By HughieD in forum Overseas Sites
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 6th Feb 16, 15:31

About us
DerelictPlaces is a forum for people with an interest in the history and documentation of disused, derelict and abandoned buildings to come together and share their experiences, photography and historical findings. Our military, industrial and historical heritage is fast disappearing under the pressure of regeneration, the need for new housing, and often through simple neglect; Our aim is to document these places before they disappear entirely.
Follow us