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Thread: Lost on the Back Roads - Exploring Rural Alberta

  1. #1
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    Default Lost on the Back Roads - Exploring Rural Alberta


    After being inside all day, I must say I was eager to get out and take a drive. It was a mostly overcast day as myself and a friend (who will remain nameless) headed out to explore the backcountry roads close to home.

    The first house that we went to see, my friend refused to enter. After crossing a soaking wet farmers field, I managed to make my way into the house.
    Although this house is the older of the two, there isn't really much left. Once inside, I heard movement and guessed correctly that it must be an animal - birds in the attic. Decay has really taken hold here and it's not going to be long before the whole front addition to the house collapses. A bit derpy but it's an explore none-the-less.

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    This greeted me as I stepped on to the front porch


    The front door led directly into what was the kitchen. Check out that wallpaper!


    I have a thing for old doors, so this one naturally caught my attention:


    The second floor of the house. The sound I heard was coming from the attic above.


    Not sure what this is exactly, but it was upstairs.



    Nice B&W parting shot of the first house.


    The second house also has quite a unique layout that appears to have been added on to and possibly renovated over the years. The second floor has an interesting layout and what appears to be doors which once had glass in them. Take a look....


    Just inside the front door:


    Another door!!


    I feel like I am being watched....


    This small green room was off to the side, maybe a later addition?


    Let's venture upstairs....


    What I found weird up here was that it appears that all the rooms either had glass in the door or the door was missing altogether.







    Parting Shot..



    Hopefully I haven't bored you all to death by now. I emerged from the explore, my feet wet and runners covered in mud from farmers fields, mainly made up of cow dung. Yep, should have worn my rubber boots....

    Till next time!













    Come follow me into the darkness.....let's see what awaits us down this darkened hallway, behind this closed door.....

  2. Thanks given by: Hugh Jorgan, jmcjnr, krela, Mearing, Missymoo16, psykie, Sausage, smiler, The Archivist, theartist
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  4. #2
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    Thats pretty interesting. I still have full glass doors in some of my bedrooms, very 70s lol
    What the hell am I doing, I mean really at my age!

  5. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by BikinGlynn View Post
    Thats pretty interesting. I still have full glass doors in some of my bedrooms, very 70s lol

    Make sure the glass is safety glass!!
    I was hospitalised in the summer of 1976 - mega drought conditions. I had sun stroke and so did many others. I still remember the bed next to mine - a teen girl aged about 15. She was pretty and had lovely long blonde hair, but, she'd fainted at home and fell through an internal glass door. Her face resembled torn scraps of cloth and blood was everywhere. I still wonder if they managed to hide the damage to her face,,
    You could stick a clear plastic sheeting over the glass to keep it together if it's damaged in any way. I just don't want a repeat of that girl :(


    A fascinating write up. It seems incredibly bleak there. Huge swathes of land I guess with no nearby towns?
    I think the metal thing was a target!
    Full of meaty goodness.

  6. #4
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    @BikinGlynn I guess I love the 70's retro look HaHa!

    @Sausage I hope that young girl turned out to be ok after all that glass. I've also had heat stroke and it really sucks, I was sick for two or three days on vacation and staying with my auntie and cousin at the time.

    I live out in the middle of nowhere in a small-ish town surrounded by farmland owned locally. People out here raise a lot of cattle and grow grain, canola, etc. It gets boring sometimes but theres another town about 15 min away; if that and the nearest city is a little over an hour, just over two hours away from the nearest metropolis.

    I didn't touch the metal thing, forgot my gloves in my excitement to get exploring!! Even though they were in my backpack at my feet in the vehicle the whole time. It possibly could have been for target practice.
    Come follow me into the darkness.....let's see what awaits us down this darkened hallway, behind this closed door.....

  7. #5
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    I enjoyed that, if bullets made them holes it would have bin a large calibre, Nice One, Thanks.
    Smiler
    😁

  8. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by smiler View Post
    I enjoyed that, if bullets made them holes it would have bin a large calibre, Nice One, Thanks.
    Very much like the imprint left by a 30-06 soft or hollow point round, although a 12 bore slug produces a very similar effect in thin gauge metal. Both types of round would be common in that neck of the woods and surplus 30 calibre ammunition was very cheap in the States. There does appear to be three holes made by normal 12/20 gauge shot around the hole in the greenish coloured bin - if this is so, then the damage was done by a normal 12 or 20 gauge cartridge discharged from a weapon held quite close to the target bin.

  9. #7
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    Dirus knows guns!

    One day I'd been to an old military target range (near Alnwick, Northumberland) and the targets had a natural hill behind them. It's almost all made of brass and lead. I grabbed one of every different type of bullet I could find and once home, showed the old man. Now my Dad knows his guns - always had them. He was amazed at the variety and spotted things fired from very old guns too. Then he went off on one describing how each would fly, how it had impacted etc etc.
    Full of meaty goodness.

  10. #8
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    Before the Powers That Be went paranoid and banned private ownership, I restored firearms for a Gunsmith friend and also had my own collection that I competed with. I have always been interested in firearm; being born in 1943, as a ten or eleven year old I can remember a mate showing me his dad's 'collection' of pistols. His Dad had been a Captain in the Paras and like many others had relieved prisoners of their sidearms on surrender, so must have been able to pocket a few. Sadly the collection ended up in the furnaces when my mate's widowed mother turned them in, following an Unlicensed Firearm's Amnesty, but my interest had been aroused. Know your old Range well Sausage, Your Dad sounds an interesting chap - msn after my own heart!

  11. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sausage View Post
    Make sure the glass is safety glass!!
    I was hospitalised in the summer of 1976 - mega drought conditions. I had sun stroke and so did many others. I still remember the bed next to mine - a teen girl aged about 15. She was pretty and had lovely long blonde hair, but, she'd fainted at home and fell through an internal glass door. Her face resembled torn scraps of cloth and blood was everywhere. I still wonder if they managed to hide the damage to her face,,
    You could stick a clear plastic sheeting over the glass to keep it together if it's damaged in any way. I just don't want a repeat of that girl :(


    A fascinating write up. It seems incredibly bleak there. Huge swathes of land I guess with no nearby towns?
    I think the metal thing was a target!
    No its not, hence Im working my way around the house replacing them.
    When I moved in I had a full non safety glass glazed screen dividing the living / dining room, was great fun getting rid of that with a hammer ;-)
    What the hell am I doing, I mean really at my age!

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