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Thread: Hebron Burialground

  1. #1
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    Default Hebron Burialground




    Hebron Methodist Church opened in 1854 with an adjoining plot of about half an acre – formerly the pleasure grounds of Mr Goulstone’s Academy – having been purchased for a burial ground. The first recorded burial took place on January 9th 1858 and the last on 11th September 1965. During this time nearly 1200 people were buried here.

    The burial ground remained in the possession of the Methodist Circuit until 1968 when the church and the burial ground were sold for £5,500. Conversion of the church into accommodation started in 2002 when the suggestion was made by the developers that the burial ground could be made into a car park for the residents of the new accommodation, now called Hebron Court, and a memorial garden. These proposals were not put before Bristol City Council and following an outcry by the newly formed Friends of Hebron Burial ground the plans were dropped. This resulted in the burial ground been sold at auction in November 2002 for £21,500.

    At the present time the burial ground is not maintained by the owner in accordance with its restrictive covenants (as was the case with the previous owner) and there is no easy access into the burial ground (the gate to the burial ground not being in the same ownership).

    Shrunken gravestone? Reason I grabbed it was to illustrate how small it is.






    The Hebron burial ground is the last resting place of the famous impostor
    Princess Caraboo, sadly her grave is unmarked.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Princess_Caraboo


    B :)


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  3. #2
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    Default Re: Hebron Burialground


    Nice one Mr B. More pics?

    Either that gravestone is very small, or you are very big.

    Turning a graveyard into a car park! What a bloody nonsense. And what a clusterf*ck they have ended up creating with their sale. Honestly, if people really could turn in their graves it would look like an earthquake was happening.

  4. #3
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    Default Re: Hebron Burialground


    Nice one Mr B. More pics?
    Thank you Mr CM, Yes I'll upload more pics soon, though with
    it being a very small graveyard I've only a handful of snaps,
    it doesn't help with it being so overgrown I could have done
    with a strimmer.

    B

  5. #4
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    Default Re: Hebron Burialground


    Right I've put a few pics in the religious section of the
    galleries, there aren't many pics due to the location
    being very small and really overgrown, I think I'll go
    back there later in the year when its not quite as
    wild.

    Oh crap they made a film about Princess Caraboo, I'm
    going to have to track it down and watch it, looks like
    a total chick flick I bet I don't make it past ten minutes?

    Stephen Rea and John Lithgow look like a right couple
    of pervs in the poster below, dirty swines.




    B ;)

  6. #5
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    Default Re: Hebron Burialground


    Like the pics, but see what you mean about the undergrowth. See if you can score a barrel of 245T from somewhere.

    Pheobe Cates? Isn't she like the Happy Shopper equivalent of Molly Ringpiece or whatever her name was from Pretty In Pink? Also, what are John Lithgow and Stephen Rea looking at?

    As to how long you will last watching, all I can say is It is hard to imagine anyone, of any age, resisting the potent charm of Princess Caraboo.

    Doesn't she have a long neck and a thin head?


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