BOOk, History of the Calderstones Hospital Railway 1907~1953

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marked-man

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The History of the least known of Lancashire's County Asylums, Whalley Asylum or as it later became known Calderstones Certified Institution for Mental Defectives, in the village of Whalley once famous for its Abbey, nearby is near Clitheroe. The book centres on the railway but with a ratio of 50:50 on asylum planning building and patients.
During the Great war it became Queen Mary's Military Hospital when it treated over 56,000 soldiers. Military ambulance trains travelled from the South Coast to unload wounded all of which is covered.

Most of the hospital was pulled down except for admin' and a number of wards

The book is A4 size on glossy art paper, 136 pages, 83 photo's, 4 maps nd almost 60,000 words includes copies of the original plans for the asylum power station. In stock at Preston Waterstones £16.50. But can be purchased from the author if you want to know anything else I'll send a synopsis.
 
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Walrus75

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Calderstones was also used during WW2 for the treatment and convalesence of wounded troops. My grandfather, who was injured at Dunkirk, met my grandmother, who was a nurse at Calderstones, in June 1940. They were married within 3 weeks. :)
 

marked-man

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It was first used during WWII when it treated troops from the Dunkirk Evacuation also it was nearly hit in an air raid later on
 

marked-man

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You are certainly right there! The link is better than anything I would have come up with and also shows both cover and WW1 photographs. The book does include its use as a certified institution alot more than the article would give it credit.

One picture does indeed say a thousand words,

Author RB Cornwell
 

Walrus75

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As it happens both my uncle and dad have read it and both found it to be a thoroughly good book. It turns out that my dad did some work at Caldestones back in the 50's as part of his electrical apprenticeship. Seems like a family thing so I spose I should pay a visit at some point! :)

Here's a newspaper article about Calderstones during WW2 --> http://www.lancashiretelegraph.co.uk/news/1682445.nurses_harrowing_ww_ii_memories/ I suspect that each of those wounded servicemen probably arrived by rail.
 
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