GRIFFIN PARK LODGE - BLACKBURN - AUGUST 2021

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TheBackpackExplorer

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Aug 6, 2021
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Location
Lancashire & London
The History
Grade II listed building Griffin Lodge dates back to 1824 & was built by Blackburn cotton magnate, Thomas Dugdale who was instrumental in bringing the first railway to the town. Griffin Lodge backs onto 9 acres of land & remained owned by the Dugdale family until the mid 1930s. In 1937 it was acquired by the Blackburn Corporation, to then be opened as a public park on 17th September.

Significant fires in October 2013 (pictured below) & January 2014 left the building as a burnt out shell causing catastrophic damage. Many attempts have been made to sell the building for restoration & It was last occupied in 2006 as home of the North West Museums Service but has been left empty since April that year.

A description of the building reads as follows:
“Red brick with stone dressings, slate roof hipped to left and prominent ridge and end stacks. Main block 2 storeys, 3 window range. Stone plinth. Corner pilasters with stone bases and capitals. Stone frieze and eaves cornice. Central porch with round-headed entrance containing double panelled doors and over light, flanked by small round-headed windows. Corner pilasters, frieze and cornice of stone. Sash windows with stone architraves. Raised stone band at first floor cill level. Projecting bay to ground floor right an addition, with tripartite sash window. Later wings to right and to rear. Richly decorated interior includes staircase with elaborate cast-iron balusters beneath a glaced lantern, sumptuous plaster work, especially to cornices, and moulded chimney pieces (one in Gothic style) to ground floor.”

The Explore

Walk into a local park & you will find yourself greeted by this massive listed building - heavily fenced around the back permitter & freshly reboarded - access is limited to say the least. Inside you must tread with extreme caution due to the masses of decay, any upper floors are just not an option & you may well find yourself meeting some of the “locals” - that is if you can make it inside. The grounds are very well kept & often partaken by dog walkers - there is even a former servant house at the very edge of the building which is restored & now has a family living there.

The Photography...

Griffin_Lodge_Original.JPG
Griffin_Lodge_Fire.JPG
DJI_0325.JPG
DJI_0355.JPG
DJI_0436.JPG
DJI_0418.JPG
DJI_0400.JPG
DJI_0394.JPG
DJI_0379.JPG
DJI_0373.JPG
DJI_0369.JPG
DSC01088.jpeg
DSC01072.jpeg


Thankyou for reading :)
 

SPEXTC

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Joined
Nov 23, 2020
Messages
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The History
Grade II listed building Griffin Lodge dates back to 1824 & was built by Blackburn cotton magnate, Thomas Dugdale who was instrumental in bringing the first railway to the town. Griffin Lodge backs onto 9 acres of land & remained owned by the Dugdale family until the mid 1930s. In 1937 it was acquired by the Blackburn Corporation, to then be opened as a public park on 17th September.

Significant fires in October 2013 (pictured below) & January 2014 left the building as a burnt out shell causing catastrophic damage. Many attempts have been made to sell the building for restoration & It was last occupied in 2006 as home of the North West Museums Service but has been left empty since April that year.

A description of the building reads as follows:
“Red brick with stone dressings, slate roof hipped to left and prominent ridge and end stacks. Main block 2 storeys, 3 window range. Stone plinth. Corner pilasters with stone bases and capitals. Stone frieze and eaves cornice. Central porch with round-headed entrance containing double panelled doors and over light, flanked by small round-headed windows. Corner pilasters, frieze and cornice of stone. Sash windows with stone architraves. Raised stone band at first floor cill level. Projecting bay to ground floor right an addition, with tripartite sash window. Later wings to right and to rear. Richly decorated interior includes staircase with elaborate cast-iron balusters beneath a glaced lantern, sumptuous plaster work, especially to cornices, and moulded chimney pieces (one in Gothic style) to ground floor.”

The Explore

Walk into a local park & you will find yourself greeted by this massive listed building - heavily fenced around the back permitter & freshly reboarded - access is limited to say the least. Inside you must tread with extreme caution due to the masses of decay, any upper floors are just not an option & you may well find yourself meeting some of the “locals” - that is if you can make it inside. The grounds are very well kept & often partaken by dog walkers - there is even a former servant house at the very edge of the building which is restored & now has a family living there.

The Photography...
Thank You for sharing. 👍👍👍 Great Aerial shots Sir.
 

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