Hotspur Press / Percy's. Manchester 0322

Derelict Places

Help Support Derelict Places:

Bignickb

Veteran Member
Veteran Member
Joined
Jul 14, 2008
Messages
144
Reaction score
709
Location
Manchester
Hotspur Press / Percy's. 0322



Formerly called the Medlock Mills and found on the bank of the aforementioned river, it was built in 1801 and one of the countless cotton mills found in Manchester during the Cottonopolis era; which made the city a world leader in its' production!

There were two other mills built nearby that were larger, I suspect one may be the old Dunlop Factory. All three were linked by Tram tunnels for the transport of materials between the sites - probably to keep fabrics out of Manchester's famous rain!

Originally - there was a factory on the site that burnt down at the end of the 18th century and cost many workers their lives. Another fire occurred in 1837 in the current building but it was not destroyed, superstitious talks of a Curse went around.

It was owned by a Cotton Baron John Fairweather and then his heirs throughout time.

By 1888 the Cotton industry began to dwindle so the site was changed to a Print works - which continued to just a few years back. Some sections were rented by artists for many years but around 2017 it closed it's doors for good.

There is talk about renovation that retains the original facia wall with modern flats rising above it, but all plans are stagnant right now.

Today I decided to take a look, I have passed this building many times over the years and it doesn't seem that long since it closed down. I had many ideas for access and None of them were required because I got in pretty quickly. There were signs of drug activity and squatting but I was fine and So happy to finally tick this extraordinary site off my list.

Enjoy!



















 

Foxylady

Veteran Member
Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 13, 2007
Messages
8,769
Reaction score
1,065
Location
East Devon's Jurassic Park!
That's quite an imposing building; it looks almost brutalistic, although much too early of course. Nice piece of history, explore and fab photos, Bignick. :)
 

Foxylady

Veteran Member
Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 13, 2007
Messages
8,769
Reaction score
1,065
Location
East Devon's Jurassic Park!
I'm great! I've been away for a while due to bad health but back now and loving it again!
I was away for several years too, apart from the odd look in. Also enjoying it again, although I don't have much time to catch up with everything so it's a bit hit and miss, lol.
 

Hayman

Well-known member
Joined
May 14, 2018
Messages
621
Reaction score
408
That's quite an imposing building; it looks almost brutalistic, although much too early of course. Nice piece of history, explore and fab photos, Bignick. :)
What did you mean by "it looks almost brutalistic, although much too early of course"? Surely, a building or other structure of any age can be "brutalistic", or of any other character. To me, King's Cross station is brutalistic.

I would hope this very substantial building is re-used. Consider the 'cost to the planet' (isn't that the cant phrase?) if it were demolished only to have a new one built in its place.
 

Foxylady

Veteran Member
Veteran Member
Joined
Jan 13, 2007
Messages
8,769
Reaction score
1,065
Location
East Devon's Jurassic Park!
What did you mean by "it looks almost brutalistic, although much too early of course"? Surely, a building or other structure of any age can be "brutalistic", or of any other character.
I meant as in the architectural term Brutalism - a style of building built in the mid 1950s - not as in the character.
 

Hayman

Well-known member
Joined
May 14, 2018
Messages
621
Reaction score
408
I've often thought "brutalistic" describes those horrendous great blocks of flats built in the Soviet Union from the 1920s onwards. In total contrast, the USSR rebuilt major buildings bombed in WWII in what was to become East Berllin just as they had been prior to 1939. At the same time in West Berlin, war-damaged buildings were just demolished, and replaced by what might well be called Brutalist architecture. Architects are as vain as any actuul prima donna when it comes to wanting to be noticed. When I lived in London, I saw plenty of brutalist blocks of flats. Egotiism will out. Le Corbusier - Charles-Édouard Jeanneret - had a big influence on mid 20th century achitecture. His "designs combine the functionalism of the modern movement with a bold sculptural expressionism" (Wikipedia). But he never had to live in them.
 

Latest posts

Top