Kraftwerk V - Germany, July 2019

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B W T

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Kraftwerk V by Tobi_urbex #11

This post is about the exploration of one of the largest abandoned structures in Germany. This time, we venture into a disused power plant that turned out to be an untouched time capsule from back when it had been abandoned decades ago. Large parts of the equipment are still here which allows us to travel back in time and experience the industry as it was fifty years ago. Join us as we explore deserted halls and find out the story of this unique historical power plant.


Kraftwerk V #01

This massive complex is a power plant built 80 years ago. It used to be one of the most powerful energy producers back in its prime. But as it is with these buildings, the facility, and all the equipment was outdated in the 90s when it was eventually shut down. Most of the machines were disassembled, so what remained is this huge shell.


Kraftwerk V #05

This is the turbine hall. Today, it is mostly empty. But in the past, there were several big machines that generated electricity - 12 turbines in total actually. And all that is left is the thing you can see in the picture above. This was part of one of the turbines, and today, it is presented like a museum piece. In the hall, there are also several control rooms which seem to be preserved just how they were when the plant closed decades ago. Under a layer of dust, we find equipment from bygone times in perfect condition.


Kraftwerk V by Tobi_urbex #04

There must have been a tremendous amount of noise and heat in here, back when everything was operational. Since only the skeleton of the colossus remains today, it is hard to imagine how working conditions might have been in the past.


Kraftwerk V #10

Located somewhere in Eastern Germany, this brown coal power station originally came online in the 1930s. The facility was not as big as it is today. And originally, the idea was to supply Berlin with electricity, but again World War Two changed everything. Surprisingly, and despite its importance, the building complex was not damaged during the war, but only after it. To compensate for the harm Nazi troops did to the world, the victorious powers, and especially the Soviets, decided to disassemble large parts of German industry as war reparations. So, starting in 1945, machines and equipment from this powerhouse were brought to the Soviet Union. But for the leviathan, this was just its temporary end.


Kraftwerk V by Tobi_urbex #07

In the past, brown coal was transported on conveyors to the furnaces. During combustion at a temperature of 1,000º Celsius, heat was produced, and boiler feed water was vaporized. The steam was then led to the turbines which were driving generators to produce electricity. That is the simplified version of how this power plant was operating decades ago.

We stopped telling you the story of this place when it was disassembled by the Soviets. Soon after, it was decided to rebuild the plant. In the 1950s, this became one of the largest powerhouses in the GDR, the German Democratic Republic. For six years, it was reconstructed and expanded. And it was bigger than it ever was before. Later, in the 1970s, it was extended even more: A new gas turbine power plant was added. But the whole facility could not be kept up to date. 30 years ago, it was completely outdated and needed to be shut down. Then, in 1994, the whole complex was decommissioned for good.


Kraftwerk V by Tobi_urbex #17

Welcome to the main control room of the power plant! Countless switches, buttons, panels, and measuring instruments - and we have no idea what they were for. How can anyone? They even had flowers here. What a nice office!


Kraftwerk V by Tobi_urbex #20

Actually, this place looks way too good, considering that the plant was shut down 30 years ago. And that is because it was preserved. Yes, a lot of the equipment in the building complex was removed, but the place itself was protected as one of the most important industrial monuments in Central Europe. "Was" being the operative word. Because what used to be a tourist attraction with signs and exhibits for some time, is not accessible anymore - at least not officially. The reason? Safety concerns.


Kraftwerk V by Tobi_urbex #15

Like the remains of a stranded deep-sea monster, the colossal building sits empty by a river. With its construction, what was once a small village full of farmers and fishermen was transformed into an important industrial base. It was the biggest employer in town. And before they were torn down, huge chimneys were casting long shadows over the settlement. 1.500 people were working here around the clock. But the brown coal era is over.


Kraftwerk V by Tobi_urbex #09

If you are now interested in seeing more of the old plant, than switch over to YouTube. We just uploaded a cinematic exploration video about this place. Please enjoy!

 

wolfism

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Nice shots, shame about the graff. V. is a great location, the scale of the turbine hall is impressive – the big control room is a b*gger to locate once you're inside, though.
 

Hayman

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In 1961/1962 I was in the army and in BAOR - West Germany. I visited an opencast quarry where bucket wheel excavators were digging clay for a nearby brick and tile works. I imagine the opencast lignite - brown coal - quarries were similar, with similar machines. Such a pleasure to know this place still exists, and undamaged by vandals.
 

recyclefraulein

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My brother lived in East Germany for a while after the wall came down. Smallkalden was the name of the town. It was very interesting to visit him. The roads were pretty bad back then. I think it was a 3 hour drive from my mothers.
 

Kilted Mac

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Kraftwerk V by Tobi_urbex #11

This post is about the exploration of one of the largest abandoned structures in Germany. This time, we venture into a disused power plant that turned out to be an untouched time capsule from back when it had been abandoned decades ago. Large parts of the equipment are still here which allows us to travel back in time and experience the industry as it was fifty years ago. Join us as we explore deserted halls and find out the story of this unique historical power plant.


Kraftwerk V #01

This massive complex is a power plant built 80 years ago. It used to be one of the most powerful energy producers back in its prime. But as it is with these buildings, the facility, and all the equipment was outdated in the 90s when it was eventually shut down. Most of the machines were disassembled, so what remained is this huge shell.


Kraftwerk V #05

This is the turbine hall. Today, it is mostly empty. But in the past, there were several big machines that generated electricity - 12 turbines in total actually. And all that is left is the thing you can see in the picture above. This was part of one of the turbines, and today, it is presented like a museum piece. In the hall, there are also several control rooms which seem to be preserved just how they were when the plant closed decades ago. Under a layer of dust, we find equipment from bygone times in perfect condition.


Kraftwerk V by Tobi_urbex #04

There must have been a tremendous amount of noise and heat in here, back when everything was operational. Since only the skeleton of the colossus remains today, it is hard to imagine how working conditions might have been in the past.


Kraftwerk V #10

Located somewhere in Eastern Germany, this brown coal power station originally came online in the 1930s. The facility was not as big as it is today. And originally, the idea was to supply Berlin with electricity, but again World War Two changed everything. Surprisingly, and despite its importance, the building complex was not damaged during the war, but only after it. To compensate for the harm Nazi troops did to the world, the victorious powers, and especially the Soviets, decided to disassemble large parts of German industry as war reparations. So, starting in 1945, machines and equipment from this powerhouse were brought to the Soviet Union. But for the leviathan, this was just its temporary end.


Kraftwerk V by Tobi_urbex #07

In the past, brown coal was transported on conveyors to the furnaces. During combustion at a temperature of 1,000º Celsius, heat was produced, and boiler feed water was vaporized. The steam was then led to the turbines which were driving generators to produce electricity. That is the simplified version of how this power plant was operating decades ago.

We stopped telling you the story of this place when it was disassembled by the Soviets. Soon after, it was decided to rebuild the plant. In the 1950s, this became one of the largest powerhouses in the GDR, the German Democratic Republic. For six years, it was reconstructed and expanded. And it was bigger than it ever was before. Later, in the 1970s, it was extended even more: A new gas turbine power plant was added. But the whole facility could not be kept up to date. 30 years ago, it was completely outdated and needed to be shut down. Then, in 1994, the whole complex was decommissioned for good.


Kraftwerk V by Tobi_urbex #17

Welcome to the main control room of the power plant! Countless switches, buttons, panels, and measuring instruments - and we have no idea what they were for. How can anyone? They even had flowers here. What a nice office!


Kraftwerk V by Tobi_urbex #20

Actually, this place looks way too good, considering that the plant was shut down 30 years ago. And that is because it was preserved. Yes, a lot of the equipment in the building complex was removed, but the place itself was protected as one of the most important industrial monuments in Central Europe. "Was" being the operative word. Because what used to be a tourist attraction with signs and exhibits for some time, is not accessible anymore - at least not officially. The reason? Safety concerns.


Kraftwerk V by Tobi_urbex #15

Like the remains of a stranded deep-sea monster, the colossal building sits empty by a river. With its construction, what was once a small village full of farmers and fishermen was transformed into an important industrial base. It was the biggest employer in town. And before they were torn down, huge chimneys were casting long shadows over the settlement. 1.500 people were working here around the clock. But the brown coal era is over.


Kraftwerk V by Tobi_urbex #09

If you are now interested in seeing more of the old plant, than switch over to YouTube. We just uploaded a cinematic exploration video about this place. Please enjoy!

Cracking photos Sir, what a place, a real skeleton of a Dinosaur. Let us hope the "Artists" are kept at bay before it get completely spoiled. A lot of Graff is really good stuff but not when it damages history which this plant really is.
 

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