Murray Asylum - May 21

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BikinGlynn

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I think I first saw @Brewtal report from this place & knew it was somewhere I wanted to see, the problem with it its just so damn far away!

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But a recent chance of an absolute epic weekend up North with my non member exploring partner & it was a must see. It appears we were just in time too as scaffold is up & diggers are present so it appears at last this beautiful building is about to be given a second lease of life.
The level of decay was in my eyes sublime, just enough natural wear but leaving original features saveable.

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The Murray Royal Asylum was designed in 1821 by William Burn and extended in 1833 by Burn and again by Andrew Heiton Junior in 1888. Situated on a hill to the east of Perth city, the asylum is the earliest surviving asylum building in Scotland and one of the few remaining from this period in the UK. Based on the 1816-18 Wakefield Asylum design

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The building is notable for its retention of its H-plan form, with few additions or extensions since 1888. Externally, the building is generally plain in its design, with the exception of the Doric porch to the entrance. Internally, there is a significant amount of 19th century decorative detail, including a well-detailed former ballroom, former library, timber verandahs and a number of timber fire surrounds. There has been alteration to the interior internally: there was an internal chapel which no longer survives and the circa 1820s staircase in the central octagon was removed in 1864 and a glass cupola added. However, a great deal of the remaining decoration and room layout is considered to be early and late 19th century

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This is extremely unusual in a building of this type, where normally much more alteration is common. The Main Building at Murray Royal was designed in 1821 and opened in 1828. It is the earliest surviving asylum building in Scotland. There were other, earlier asylums built: Montrose was the first in 1782, followed by Aberdeen (1800), Glasgow (1807), Dundee (1812) and Edinburgh (1813). These buildings have all been demolished. The Murray Royal hospital was founded from a bequest by a local man, James Murray.

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The place has been gooned a bit recently but I loved it here & for an empty building its pretty bloody spectacular so have a lot of pics to share so Ill just get on with them

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img]https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51245996715_bbc6e34967_c.jpg[/img]

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Note the JCB in this shot ready to start work

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Thanks for looking
 

Hayman

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That's a really well put together report, and your third shot is superb. :)
"A selection of my photos..." What a selection! I've just spent over an hour looking through the wide ranging pics. I'd never heard of the La Petite Ceinture railway in Paris. Quite an enterprising venture. At least they do not rip up everything the day after it is closed - as we do in the UK. I wonder what happened to the forward control Land-Rover 101. How old were the beam engines in the pump house? They looked fairly modern.
 

wolfism

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"A selection of my photos..." What a selection! I've just spent over an hour looking through the wide ranging pics. I'd never heard of the La Petite Ceinture railway in Paris. Quite an enterprising venture. At least they do not rip up everything the day after it is closed - as we do in the UK. I wonder what happened to the forward control Land-Rover 101. How old were the beam engines in the pump house? They looked fairly modern.
Cheers, I don't want to derail BikinGlynn's thread but very briefly - the 101 disappeared along with other ex-Army vehicles when the wharf was redeveloped for housing. And the beam engines date from the 1870's, but they were restored about 20 years ago…
 

Hayman

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Cheers, I don't want to derail BikinGlynn's thread but very briefly - the 101 disappeared along with other ex-Army vehicles when the wharf was redeveloped for housing. And the beam engines date from the 1870's, but they were restored about 20 years ago…
Thanks for the info. As someone who used Series Land Rovers for work many years ago, and who has travelled up mouintain roads in Africa in a 101, it caught my attention. I hope it was not scrapped. The restoration of the beam engine accounts for its good looks.
 
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