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Porth wen brickworks june 2019

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waveydave

Out & About Exploration
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Hinckley
Its been such a long time since i last did a report, (seems like forever since i last went moochin), but i thought i'd try the new format.
In a remote piece of coastline on the isle of Anglesey sits the remains of a victorian brickworks.
An abundance of quartzite nearby, rich in silica, provided the ingredients for making firebricks for the steel industry.
The quartzite was mined up on the hillside and winched down an incline to the cliff tops. Here it was fed into several tiers of crushing machines until it arrived at the bottom in a usable form. Bricks were shaped initially by cutting with wire but later by moulding. These were placed in a drying room before going into one of several beehive kilns.
Problems arose when it came to transporting the bricks as the only way was by ship. At low tide the bay is covered in sharp rocky outcrops and unfavourable tidal conditions made it extremely perilous for ships to dock.
Mining and brick making took place here from 1850 until about 1914 when a decline in demand and a massive decline in quality proved to be the end of the works. Some brickmaking did occur some years later but innevitably failed and total abandonment came in 1949.
Getting to this site is fairly easy, parking isnt. After following the coastal path we found what was once an incline which leads down through all manner of wild plantlife. The site as yet, is invisible but reaching the bottom of the incline the full site reveals itself and there is a definite WOW factor. Three beehive kilns remain along with several pieces of machinery. Evidence remains of the drying room with the underfloor heating system visible where the sea has eroded away the surface.
Unfortunately the sea is really taking a toll with large sections of floor section totally gone and the main building has been severely undermined and is on the verge of total collapse.
op on the hillside we found the remains of the winding drum used to lower the ore to the cliff tops. Complete with wheels and brake mechanism this is a rarity indeed. A more macabre find was the skeletal remains of a sheep that was for some reason wearing a harness and lead.
A truly awesome place and well worth the 3 hour drive, although i doubt id say that if it were wet and windy.
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Tbolt

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Fook me it worked, thanks for lookin
Ayup Mr Wavy, hope you are good sir.
I never tire of seeing this place and everyone's pics are better than mine were cus it was chucking it down when I was there.

Nice shots sir
 

BikinGlynn

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Nice place, must go there someday. Why does that dead sheep appear to be wearing a harness?
 

waveydave

Out & About Exploration
Joined
Nov 6, 2015
Messages
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Location
Hinckley
Ayup Mr Wavy, hope you are good sir.
I never tire of seeing this place and everyone's pics are better than mine were cus it was chucking it down when I was there.

Nice shots sir
Thanks sir. Must be horrid there in the wind and rain, we were lucky
 
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