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Primitive Methodist - Doncaster

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BikinGlynn

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Working through the "P"s in my folders heres a completely empty church I did earlier this year.



The Primitive Methodist Chapel was built during 1867 (The Builder, February 15, 1868) and is dated 1868 on a panel near the apex of the principal, north-west gable.
The chapel was designed by Mr W Watson, a well-established family firm of architects in Wakefield over at least three generations. The builder was Mr Harold Arnold.

A Doncaster Primitive Methodist Circuit was first formed in 1823, but it struggled and for a while belonged to the Sheffield and then the Scotter Circuits. It then began to prosper, largely due to John Garner, a travelling preacher, and in 1852 the Doncaster Primitive Methodist Circuit became autonomous again. At this time there were 56 local preachers and 29 preaching places, with 551 members. In 1858 the importance of Primitive Methodism in Doncaster was acknowledged with the holding of the 30th Conference in the town. In 1870 two Circuits were formed, with Balby belonging to the First Circuit.
The chapel closed its doors in 2008



There really was nothing in here & it was not really worth the literal ball ache it was to get in. but Iv managed to rustle a report from it regardless.





















Thanks For Looking
 

Darklldo

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Someone was serious about taking the floor boards weren't they. I assume there were once leadlights in the windows. Thoroughly stripped and deserted. It gives the church a sense of abandonment doesn't it.
 

Dirus_Strictus

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I assume there were once leadlights in the windows.
No; just plain glass panes. This is a derelict Primitive Methodist Chapel, so leaded lights were a definite no, no! Just a very plain building that did not detract from their prayers and thoughts to God. The firm of Arnold's was a well known builder of housing property to let in Doncaster and being a Doncaster Lad, I lived in an Arnold's house in Queen's Road for the first twenty years of my life. My farther bought the property when a family friend, who was Arnold's Accountant, tipped him off that the firm was reducing its letting stock. Fun days, with Nutall's Mintoes sweet factory at the bottom of the road - can still the Mint in the air!
 
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Darklldo

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Hi Dirus_Strictus, thanks for the answer on the windows. Pity there were no lead lights, the windows are a most attractive shape for them. Oh, of course no distractions from God - fair enough I suppose. I have to admit if they had had lead lights and I had been a worshipper I could so easily been distracted.
Ooh a sweet factory just down the road - yummy 😃
 

Openfields

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Depending on its location this should make a brilliant conversion. Being in an urban location and without any garden area it would probably be more suited to being two or three flats. The infrastructure looks sound enough. The sloping floor might present a challenge but with two main entrances the exterior would work well for two dwellings. As with other old church/chapel conversions the lack of domestic plumbing will need to be sorted out first but plenty of space under a new flat level floor to work with. Without too many external changes I'd doubt there'd be any problems with the planning application. So it would just be the cost of conversion. However with house prices in Doncaster being fairly low it maybe uneconomical to carry out such a project.
 

G1EFU

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jondoel

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To be fair it is grim Victorian with little architectural merit
 
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