Royal London Hospital (2018)

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Rolfey

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By the middle of the 18th century there were five voluntary hospitals in London (St Bartholomew's, Guy's, St Thomas', Westminster and St George's) which provided free medical care to those who could not afford it, however there were none in the east of the City, serving the rapidly growing, and comparatively impoverished population there; this was the void that the London Hospital was to fill. The institution that was to become the Royal London Hospital was founded on 23 September 1740, when seven gentlemen met in the Feathers Tavern in Cheapside in the City of London to subscribe to the formation of an "intended new infirmary."

On 3 November the London Infirmary opened in a house on Featherstone Street, Moorfields. The staff consisted of one surgeon, physician and apothecary; and was operated as a voluntary hospital, in which patients were not charged for treatment and their care was funded charitably from annual subscription fees.

In May 1741 the hospital moved to larger premises in Prescot Street, in that time in an exceedingly bad district. In 1742, the 2nd Duke of Richmond was persuaded by the hospital's surgeon, John Harrison, to become the first President of the new hospital.The name changed to the London Hospital around 1748. By 1744 the houses at Prescot Street were in an unfit state and a subscription fund for a new building was opened, and the current site was acquired at Whitechapel Mount (then relatively sparsely built on); however funds were acquired slowly and it was not until September 1757 that patients and staff moved into the new premises, which were purpose-built and accommodated 300 beds.The next year, the trustees of the charity acquired a royal charter so that they could constitute themselves as a legal entity.

Medical students had been recorded as studying under the staff of the London Hospital as private pupils since the year it had begun, however it was not until 1785 that the London Hospital Medical College was founded; chiefly through the efforts of William Blizard, the hospital's surgeon. Private medical schools had been long established, but the London College was the first medical school in England and Wales organised in connection with a hospital.It amalgamated in 1995 with St Bartholomew's Hospital Medical College, under the aegis of Queen Mary and Westfield College to become St Bartholomew's and the Royal London School of Medicine and Dentistry.

Joseph Merrick, known as the "Elephant Man", was admitted to the hospital in 1886 and spent the last few years of life there. His mounted skeleton is currently housed at the medical school, but is not on public display.
Plaque commemorating Edith Cavell's work at the hospital

In the late 1890s, Edith Cavell, who later helped some 200 Allied soldiers escape from German-occupied Belgium during the First World War, trained and worked as a nurse at the hospital.In the early part of the twentieth century the hospital sent out 160 nurses to work unsupervised in private houses. This earned £4,000 a year, a profit of £1,700.
Facade of the old Royal London Hospital building
In 1990 the Queen visited the hospital and added "Royal" to the name, to celebrate the 250th anniversary of its founding. The present School of Nursing and Midwifery was formed in 1994 by the merger of the schools from St Bartholomew's Hospital and the Royal London Hospital to become the St Bartholomew School of Nursing & Midwifery. Prior to this, the school of nursing was known as the Princess Alexandra College of Nursing and Midwifery. In 1995 the new Nursing School was incorporated into City University, London.

In March 2005 planning permission was granted for the redevelopment and expansion of the Royal London Hospital. The scheme was procured under a Private Finance Initiative contract in 2006. Sited on the grounds of the existing hospital, the works involved the replacement of certain of the hospital's old facilities, some of which date back to when the hospital moved to its existing site in 1757.The works also involved the creation of a new trauma and emergency care centre and substantial new renal and paediatric facilities. These works, which were designed by HOK and undertaken by Skanska at a cost of £650 million,were completed in 2015.The old hospital buildings are being converted into a new civic centre for Tower Hamlets Council.



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Thanks for looking!!
 

prettyvacant71

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Good old PFI contracts screwing the tax payer from cradle to grave. Very nice explore you had by the looks of it rolfey!
 

Rolfey

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Thank you looking forward to seeing your pictures on the place! It’s taken abit of time with the camera but I’m gettin there! And thank you rubex ;)
 

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