Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Liverpool Speke Airport - May 2018

  1. #1
    Join Date
    September 2013
    Location
    Near London Charing Cross.
    Age
    31
    Posts
    1,908
    Thanked
    4806

    Red face Liverpool Speke Airport - May 2018


    Liverpool Speke Airport


    With a fair amount to do lately I can happily go through my backlog, an finally post places that are just stored and awaiting eyeballs, cant say this is my usual type of place, as I just prefer derp houses, but I couldnt pass up an opportunity to see inside some of these planes!

    So passing by probably 420 miles away from my hometown, I took a quick stop off to see what I could photograph here, having been busy most of the day and the sun was in that mood of burning eyes, I needed a break from being blinded. So what better way to kill time then check out what remains here, have to say I couldnt believe my luck, as most people walk away with externals and these planes hardly ever get seen from the inside often.

    Some history below but many know it, I posted these photos on my fb page and an old gent replied how his first flight was from here around 1948 in a BEA Dragon rapids... interesting indeed, he also sent me a few pictures of of some planes at the airport from the 40's.

    History

    Liverpool Speke airport owes its existence to a small private flying club that was based at Hooton Park in the Wirral. It was through the club that Sir Alan Cobham, an English aviation pioneer, visited the area, as part of a wider tour to promote flying and educate the public about the benefits of flying. Liverpool City Council were quick to hear of his visit and immediately invited Cobham to survey possible sites for an aerodrome somewhere in the Merseyside area. Following a number of thorough surveys, Cobham settled on Speke or Hooton Park as being the most suitable sites. After receiving this news, the City Council pressed for Liverpool to have the aerodrome and, in 1928, purchased 2,000 acres of land within the grounds of Speke Hall – a manor house that was built in 1530.

    Construction of Liverpool Speke Airport commenced in 1929. An existing chapel and farm buildings were used as terminal buildings and a control centre, and a large metal hanger was built opposite the main farm house. This hanger, along with two of the farm buildings, are said to still exist today. Once completed, the new airport was issued a licence in July 1930. Imperial Airways were the first company to offer a service from the airport, between Liverpool-Manchester-Birmingham-Croydon; however, the service was abandoned after three months, meaning the aerodrome continued all further operations on a flying club basis.

    The airport was officially opened once again on 1st July 1933, after the Liverpool Corporation appointed an airport manager. Following the new opening, the airport gained a number of airlines that operated regular services, such as Blackpool and West Coast Air Services, Aer Lingus, Hillman Airways and British Airways. By 1935 the air traffic was building up to the extent that an expansion was required. The City Council purchased new equipment, facilities and two new hangers to cope with the demand. The present control tower was completed in 1937, and the terminal building attached was added later in 1939.

    By the end of 1939, however, the atmosphere at Liverpool Speke changed significantly. With the onset of WW2, the Royal Air Force (RAF) requisitioned the airport and two new hangers were constructed, along with other hutted accommodation. Armed forces connections were then introduced as No. 611 Squadron moved onto the site with their Avro Tutor aircraft and Hawker Hart bombers. In the weeks that followed, more Squadrons arrived in Liverpool and set up base at the airport. A number of factories were later constructed within the vicinity, to provide a continuous supply of fighters and bombers to the war effort. By the early 1940s, Liverpool Speke was overloaded with over 200 hundred military aircraft, and hundreds of incomplete machines. The vast majority of the commercial airlines were also appropriated by the RAF and pressed into service. The airport became even more crowded during 1941 and 1942, when Liverpool had to defend itself against the Luftwaffe. A large force of Spitfires and Hurricanes were required to protect the city. All in all, the home based No. 611 Squadron destroyed over 240 enemy aircraft throughout the war. Normal commercial services resumed operations in 1945 after VE-day.

    Following the war, expansion work was carried out and the runways were lengthened as the number of passengers had risen from 50,000 at the end of the war to 78,000 in 1948. As with most airports across England, Liverpool Speke continued to expand to meet increasing numbers of travellers and the ever-changing demands of newer and more sophisticated technologies. The original Grade II listed terminus building was closed in 1986 after the completion of a much more modern passenger terminal which was situated next to the new, larger, 7,500ft runway which had been built in 1966. The old terminal building remained abandoned for a number of years, until it was converted into an Art Deco hotel in 2001. The former apron of the terminal is also listed and retained in its original condition; although, it is no longer connected to the airport or subject to airside access control. In fact, it is now used as a car park and to house an old Liverpool Airport vehicle and several aircrafts


    Main externals...














    First this one!
























































    Have to say I enjoyed this despite it not being my usual moody types of places, cheers for looking
    The Atmospheric Photographer - After Everyone Leftİ


    View More Of My Work & Up To Date Explores Via Link!


  2. Thanks given by: ajarb, etc100, Ferox, ginger5092, HughieD, krela, Lavino, Mearing, Mikeymutt, noiseboy72, oldscrote, paul.richards.up, psykie, rockfordstone, Scattergun, smiler, theartist
  3.  
     
  4. #2
    Join Date
    November 2011
    Posts
    106
    Thanked
    58

    Default


    like that , any more?

  5. Thanks given by: mockingbird
  6. #3
    Join Date
    October 2010
    Location
    Lost in Cornwall
    Posts
    4,847
    Thanked
    3423

    Default


    Interesting place MB, you shot a great set a'pics, Thanks
    Smiler
    😁

  7. Thanks given by: mockingbird
  8. #4
    Join Date
    October 2013
    Posts
    3,069
    Thanked
    11566

    Default


    Loved this thanks.not your usual thing
    I like to go where others fear to tread.

  9. Thanks given by: mockingbird
  10. #5
    Join Date
    February 2015
    Location
    Aberdeen, Scotland
    Age
    62
    Posts
    2,499
    Thanked
    1613

    Default


    Nice pictures and very detailed. Looks like the cloud formation was in your favour as it has made your shots stand out.
    When the going gets tough - the tough get going.

  11. Thanks given by: mockingbird
  12. #6
    Join Date
    September 2013
    Location
    Near London Charing Cross.
    Age
    31
    Posts
    1,908
    Thanked
    4806

    Default


    Quote Originally Posted by theartist View Post
    like that , any more?
    Think I covered the best bits, I'm sure countless externals won't be great after awhile ha, cheers for the comment :)
    The Atmospheric Photographer - After Everyone Leftİ


    View More Of My Work & Up To Date Explores Via Link!


  13. #7
    Join Date
    September 2013
    Location
    Near London Charing Cross.
    Age
    31
    Posts
    1,908
    Thanked
    4806

    Default


    Quote Originally Posted by smiler View Post
    Interesting place MB, you shot a great set a'pics, Thanks
    Thank you :) thought it was worth the look doing so much travelling at moment, been everywhere lately :)
    The Atmospheric Photographer - After Everyone Leftİ


    View More Of My Work & Up To Date Explores Via Link!


  14. Thanks given by: stu8fish
  15. #8
    Join Date
    September 2013
    Location
    Near London Charing Cross.
    Age
    31
    Posts
    1,908
    Thanked
    4806

    Default


    Quote Originally Posted by Mikeymutt View Post
    Loved this thanks.not your usual thing
    Thanks buddy, yep out of the normal for me :)
    The Atmospheric Photographer - After Everyone Leftİ


    View More Of My Work & Up To Date Explores Via Link!


  16. #9
    Join Date
    September 2013
    Location
    Near London Charing Cross.
    Age
    31
    Posts
    1,908
    Thanked
    4806

    Default


    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh Jorgan View Post
    Nice pictures and very detailed. Looks like the cloud formation was in your favour as it has made your shots stand out.
    Thanks :) beautiful weather but I do hate the sun, either way I'm glad I stopped off worth a look that's for sure, the clouds an brighter pictures may have favoured me here :)
    The Atmospheric Photographer - After Everyone Leftİ


    View More Of My Work & Up To Date Explores Via Link!


  17. Thanks given by: Hugh Jorgan
  18. #10
    Join Date
    November 2016
    Posts
    228
    Thanked
    469

    Default


    Something different bud. Nicely shot. I like the pics from inside the planes :)

  19. Thanks given by: mockingbird
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Old Speke Aerodrome, Liverpool - April 2013
    By PaulPowers in forum Misc Sites
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11th Apr 13, 16:27
  2. Raf Speke And Pill Boxes,Liverpool May 2011
    By kevsy21 in forum Military Sites
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 6th May 11, 17:13
  3. R.A.F. Speke & R.O.C.post,Liverpool,Jan2011.
    By wherever i may roam in forum Military Sites
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 1st Feb 11, 22:54
  4. Replies: 15
    Last Post: 27th Sep 10, 22:34
  5. R.A.F Speke/Speke airport.
    By philpridd in forum Military Sites
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 8th Jul 10, 21:26

About us
DerelictPlaces is a forum for people with an interest in the history and documentation of disused, derelict and abandoned buildings to come together and share their experiences, photography and historical findings. Our military, industrial and historical heritage is fast disappearing under the pressure of regeneration, the need for new housing, and often through simple neglect; Our aim is to document these places before they disappear entirely.
Follow us