RAF Rivenhall

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This is one I explored a year ago and didnt get around to posting.

The History

RAF Rivenhall in Essex, opened in October 1943 and was initially used by the US 9th Air Force.

Various domestic accommodation sites were constructed dispersed away from the airfield on the south side, but within a mile or so of the technical support site, also using clusters of Maycrete or Nissen huts. These Huts were either connected, set up end-to-end or built singly and made of prefabricated corrugated iron with a door and two small windows at the front and back. They provided accommodation for 2,594 personnel, including communal and a sick quarters. It is this site where the majority of the remaining building are left.

In January 1944 three squadrons (380th, 381st and 382nd) from the 363rd FIghter Group arrived at Rivenhall, and was one of the first bases to have the P-51 Mustang (below left). They moved out in April 1944, to be replaced by the the 397th Bomb Group flying B-26 Maurauders (below right) which played a major part before and after D-Day, attacking tactical targets such as bridges.

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The airfield was later taken over by the RAF and Nos 295 and 570 Squadrons supported Resistance forces by delivering supplies such as weaponry and other equipment. In March 1945 Rivenhall aircraft towed 60 paratroop assault gliders over the River Rhine as part of Operation Varsity. It was the largest single airborne operation in history to be carried out in a day and in one location and was designed to allow the Allies to secure a foothold in western Germany.

Rivenhall Airfield closed in September 1946 and the site later become a post-war campsite for displaced Polish people. The site was used for many years after this by the Marconi company for radar testing and the northern half of the airfield has been turned into a quarry.

The Explore

The first building I came to was the remains of a picket post / sentry point.
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Just up the track from that, the remaings of a load of nissan huts could be seen amongst the trees. I think these are the remains of the station ofices,briefing huts and accomodation.
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Stepping inside, these nissan huts are is a beautifully dilapidated state
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Moving further into wodds there is the sotre room where they used to keep the Norden Bomb Sites (from when the airfield was for US bombers).

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The Operations Block and other ancilliary buildings

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Some lovely bits of electrical equipment
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My favourite picture

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As I was heading off, the light coming thorugh the trees was lovely, though I dont think my camera phone did it justice.

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This is one I explored a year ago and didnt get around to posting.

The History

RAF Rivenhall in Essex, opened in October 1943 and was initially used by the US 9th Air Force.

Various domestic accommodation sites were constructed dispersed away from the airfield on the south side, but within a mile or so of the technical support site, also using clusters of Maycrete or Nissen huts. These Huts were either connected, set up end-to-end or built singly and made of prefabricated corrugated iron with a door and two small windows at the front and back. They provided accommodation for 2,594 personnel, including communal and a sick quarters. It is this site where the majority of the remaining building are left.

In January 1944 three squadrons (380th, 381st and 382nd) from the 363rd FIghter Group arrived at Rivenhall, and was one of the first bases to have the P-51 Mustang (below left). They moved out in April 1944, to be replaced by the the 397th Bomb Group flying B-26 Maurauders (below right) which played a major part before and after D-Day, attacking tactical targets such as bridges.

View attachment 525265 View attachment 525266

The airfield was later taken over by the RAF and Nos 295 and 570 Squadrons supported Resistance forces by delivering supplies such as weaponry and other equipment. In March 1945 Rivenhall aircraft towed 60 paratroop assault gliders over the River Rhine as part of Operation Varsity. It was the largest single airborne operation in history to be carried out in a day and in one location and was designed to allow the Allies to secure a foothold in western Germany.

Rivenhall Airfield closed in September 1946 and the site later become a post-war campsite for displaced Polish people. The site was used for many years after this by the Marconi company for radar testing and the northern half of the airfield has been turned into a quarry.

The Explore

The first building I came to was the remains of a picket post / sentry point.
View attachment 525267

Just up the track from that, the remaings of a load of nissan huts could be seen amongst the trees. I think these are the remains of the station ofices,briefing huts and accomodation.
View attachment 525268 View attachment 525269
View attachment 525270 View attachment 525271

Stepping inside, these nissan huts are is a beautifully dilapidated state
View attachment 525272 View attachment 525273
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View attachment 525276View attachment 525277View attachment 525278

Moving further into wodds there is the sotre room where they used to keep the Norden Bomb Sites (from when the airfield was for US bombers).

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The Operations Block and other ancilliary buildings

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Some lovely bits of electrical equipment
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My favourite picture

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As I was heading off, the light coming thorugh the trees was lovely, though I dont think my camera phone did it justice.

View attachment 525291
Looks great explore
 
I envy you having all this derelict RAF stuff in Essex, not really sure if there is anything remotely like that in the North West of England. Always amazes me how nature reclaims these places too, great pics!!
 
Nice - I went there about 8 years ago and TBH its hasn't really got much worse in the dilapidation stakes which is good!
 
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