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Thread: Norwich City (Earlham Road) Cemetery - April 2011

  1. #1
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    Default Norwich City (Earlham Road) Cemetery - April 2011


    Norwich City Council manages two cemeteries, one on Earlham Road and the other on Rosary Road. Earlham Road cemetery is bordered by Earlham Road in the south, by Bowthorpe Road in the north and by Dereham Road in the north-east, and it is divided into two sections by Farrow Road (A140) which traverses it from north to south.

    Old Boulton & Paul Ltd lock on one of the gates.



    The cemetery has separate areas for different religious beliefs, several funeral chapels and a Jewish mortuary chapel. There is also a crematorium.







    Opened in 1856, the year when burials within the city were banned, the cemetary originally covered an area of 34 acres, some of which was initially put to agricultural use. At the time the burial ground opened, many families could not afford to buy a headstone for their deceased, and of the 745 burials that took place over the first 10 months only four were marked by gravestones. Although burials had increased to 1640 by the year 1890, there were still only 214 headstones. With mortality rates in the army being considerably higher than those of civilians of similar age back then, many of the dead that lie buried in unmarked graves were soldiers from the Britannia Barracks. In 1875 the Burials Board decided to designate an area expressly for the burial of soldiers.





    This monument marks the grave of Charles Turner who was Sheriff of Norwich in 1824 and Mayor in 1854. He died in 1861.









    Monument to members of the Coleman family (of mustard fame), commemorating Sarah Ann, the wife of George Lobuck Coleman, aged 43, and George Lobuck Coleman, grandson of the above, who died when only 6 years old.





    One of the old cast iron plot markers in the cemetery.



    Monument for Henry Trevor. The inscription informs that he was the founder of Trevor, Page & Co (home furnishers and removers) and the creator of the Plantation Garden at 4 Earlham Road between 1856 and 1897.



    Too garish for my liking - the plot designated for the burials of infants and stillborn babies, and the memorial gardens.





    I quickly returned to areas where more subtle colours prevail and spotted this headstone with a big hole in it.



    And this beautiful statue of an angel seated on a tomb chest.



    This lichen-covered stone stands in the Jewish plot which is also known as Bowthorpe Jewish cemetery. It is situated to the east of Norwich Community Hospital and can be accessed from Bowthorpe Road. The inscriptions here are in Hebrew and in English.







    From here I wandered over to the Roman Catholic plot which adjoins Earlham Road, where I found quite a few Italian names and one inscription in Polish.

















    This large stone commemorates Erminio William Louis Marchesi (Mark) who was the founder of the Round Table Movement.




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    Thanks given by: 32nd_Degree, Alansworld, Faing, fluffy5518, John_D, quadbod, RichardH, sYnc_below, tony willett, Tstranger1066

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  3. #2
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    Mmm, I love me some cemetery, and that's a really nice selection of photos.
    Last edited by RichardH; 4th Apr 11 at 19:48. Reason: cemetary, cemetery, whatever

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    Thanks given by: hamishsfriend

  4. #3
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    Looks like a lovely cemetary, very very interesting. Thanks for sharing

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    Thanks given by: hamishsfriend

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    Lovely pics, lovely cemetery. I love a good cemetery.
    That headstone with the hole in it is intriguing - looks almost like it could be a bullet hole!

    A

    Warning: do not stare at a laser beam with your remaining good eye

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  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alansworld View Post
    Lovely pics, lovely cemetery. I love a good cemetery.
    That headstone with the hole in it is intriguing - looks almost like it could be a bullet hole!

    A
    Thank you. I too am wondering how on earth that hole got into the headstone. A bullet or a heavy blow with a hammer? It is dated 1861, has survived two wars. Could it be war damage?

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  7. #6
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    Interesting set of pictures, makes me want to go and explore Highgate Cemetery again, not wandered round that one for about 30 odd years when I used to work nearby. :wcool:

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    Thanks given by: hamishsfriend

  8. #7
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    Another great cemetery post and some really good pics, especially liked the angel sitting on the tomb

    thanks
    Last edited by podman; 5th Apr 11 at 11:36. Reason: need to learn to spell...

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  9. #8
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    Fascinating! Thanks for those.

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    Thanks given by: hamishsfriend

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by podman View Post
    Another great cemetery post and some really good pics, especially liked the angel sitting on the tomb

    thanks
    Thank you. Glad you enjoyed the post.

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  11. #10
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    In a quiet corner is a small group of graves written in German, with the iron cross symbol. The graves of German aircrews shot down in the war.

    Derek

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