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Thread: Pitchford hall June 2015

  1. #1
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    Default Pitchford hall June 2015


    Visited this amazing grade one listed mansion with woopashoopaa and Tom let me just say what a great huge building this is with so many great features. Spend hours here just wondering around this place. The grounds and views are out of this world. With its own chapel in its vast grounds. And that is totally untouched. Complete with electricity the stained glass well these pics don't do the place justice. On with my history and pictures of the place....

    Pitchford Hall was built in 1560-70 by William Ottley, the Sheriff of Shropshire. However, the Hall probably has a 14th or 15th century core within the current structure.

    Originally, the hall was set in around 14 hectares of park and woodland. Attached to the hall is an orangery, which is also registered 'at risk' (Grade II listing).

    The treehouse (perched in a large lime tree) at Pitchford Hall was built in the 17th century in the same style as the hall itself.

    It may be the oldest oldest treehouse in the world, and even boasts an oak floor and gothic windows!

    The estate also contains some good examples of Roman and Victorian baths.

    Shrewsbury & Atcham Borough Council recently suggested designating Pitchford as a conservation Area, but the idea wasn't popular with locals.

    Unlike other similar properties, the hall has always remained in private hands - in fact it remained in the same family for many generations.

    However, in 1992, the then owners - financially hit by their responsibilities as Lloyds names - were forced to sell off the hall and for the first time in its history, the estate was split up.

    Pitchford Hall and estate are now separately owned.

    Pitchford Hall
    Pitchford Hall
    The condition of the hall is classified by English Heritage as 'fair'.

    Extensive work was done on the hall in the 19th century. Despite now lying vacant, ongoing work has improved the condition of the roof in particular. Additional work is required to some timber in the East wing and around window frames.

    Pitchford has also attracted a fair number of celebrities. In 1832, a few years before her coronation, the young Queen Victoria visited the hall with her mother. In her diary, the princess describes the hall as a large "cottage"!

    Meanwhile, in 1935, the hall also received the Duke of York and his wife - later to become George VI and Queen Elizabeth (the Queen Mother).

    It is claimed that Prince Rupert sought refuge in the hall's priest hole after the siege of Shrewsbury, while some of his troops hid in the subterranean tunnel on the estate.

    Pitchford Hall is also reputed to be home to a number of ghosts, including an unknown cavalier and the late owner, Robin Grant.











    The beatyful chapel..



















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  4. #2
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  5. Thanks given by: Andiea, DirtyJigsaw, flyboys90, Hugh Jorgan, Jolee, Mearing, Mikeymutt, ocelot397, Old Wilco, oldscrote, rockfordstone, Rubex, scribe, smiler, The_Derp_Lane, Tizzme, trainman, tumble112, UrbanX
  6. #3
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    /what a lovely place. Thanks.

  7. #4
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    Yeah it really is this place is one of the best the chapel windows are sooo nice..

  8. #5
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    Oooh that's very nice.liking that chapel thank you
    I like to go where others fear to tread.

  9. #6
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    I love this ! Thanks, what a fascinating building 👍😍

  10. #7
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    Very nice indeed.

  11. #8
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    What an amazing place! really good pics too!

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    Apparently there's a secret door behind the wood paneling in one of the rooms that leads to some tunnels I only found this out after my visit so unfortunately I did look for it.

  13. #10
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    What a beautiful site and the stained glass is amazing.Great information and pics.

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