Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 16 of 16

Thread: The Holiday Shack

  1. #11
    Join Date
    February 2008
    Location
    Rawdon Leeds
    Age
    76
    Posts
    1,848
    Thanked
    1598

    Default


    Quote Originally Posted by AmositeMilitia93 View Post
    What's the history on this? Looks to be an old Asbestos toilet cistern
    It's a pre Nationalisation brake composite coach sold off in the early '50's and dumped on a piece of land as holiday or perhaps permanent accommodation. Very common to see these dumped on any suitable coastal headland until the early '80's, by which time new bye-laws had started to see them scrapped and removed. You paid your money to the Rail Company/ BR (in later times) and the coach was taken to the nearest station siding adjacent your chosen plot of land. Local contractor or farmer then dragged the coach on two rubber tyred dollies to where you wanted it placed. Some people were lucky and managed to buy surplus Railway Company Holiday Coaches - just a bloody big caravan really, except it was moved by railway engine and parked up on a siding in a picturesque area, usually near a small habitation and active rail station. The cistern is your good old Bakelite item made by Armitage Shanks and still found in 1000's of UK properties.

    Last edited by Dirus_Strictus; 2nd Aug 17 at 15:32. Reason: typo

  2. Thanks given by: AmositeMilitia93
  3.  
     
  4. #12
    Join Date
    October 2010
    Location
    Lost in Cornwall
    Posts
    4,854
    Thanked
    3424

    Default


    Nice One, DS, Thanks
    Smiler
    😁

  5. #13
    Join Date
    February 2008
    Location
    Rawdon Leeds
    Age
    76
    Posts
    1,848
    Thanked
    1598

    Default


    Quote Originally Posted by krela View Post
    Places like this always remind me how much things have changed over the passed 100 years and how easy we have it in comparison. That place must have been absolutely freezing and damp.
    I agree with your sentiments, although the Holiday coaches I have already mentioned were OK in the summer months. The problem was that the surplus wooden framed passenger coaches purchased to convert into living accommodation, although well insulated when built, had a long operating life on the not so even track-work of the period and that meant exterior joints opened up. This allowed the wind and rain to penetrate the external cladding and seep through the interior boarding and insulation (although personally I would rather live in a rickety structure where the asbestos insulation was always wet, rather than have it dry!). The next generation of steel clad coaching stock was not must better, once they started to rust after years of service and then years of exposure to salt laden sea air.

    On a serious note - If one comes across one of these old coaches (there are still a few about built into larger structures), be very careful how you walk about inside if you see the interior cladding/boarding is damaged. These things were sold off before BR started its program of asbestos removal and the problems start when it's disturbed.

  6. Thanks given by: smiler
  7. #14
    Join Date
    July 2017
    Location
    Wollaston, Northamptonshire
    Age
    27
    Posts
    8
    Thanked
    4

    Default


    Quote Originally Posted by Dirus_Strictus View Post
    It's a pre Nationalisation brake composite coach sold off in the early '50's and dumped on a piece of land as holiday or perhaps permanent accommodation. Very common to see these dumped on any suitable coastal headland until the early '80's, by which time new bye-laws had started to see them scrapped and removed. You paid your money to the Rail Company/ BR (in later times) and the coach was taken to the nearest station siding adjacent your chosen plot of land. Local contractor or farmer then dragged the coach on two rubber tyred dollies to where you wanted it placed. Some people were lucky and managed to buy surplus Railway Company Holiday Coaches - just a bloody big caravan really, except it was moved by railway engine and parked up on a siding in a picturesque area, usually near a small habitation and active rail station. The cistern is your good old Bakelite item made by Armitage Shanks and still found in 1000's of UK properties.
    Thanks for the info. Yeah, find them all the time. That's what I'm paid to do haha.
    "We know now that in the early years of the twentieth century, This world was being watched closely, By intelligences greater than man's and yet as mortal as his own"

  8. #15
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Cambridgeshire
    Posts
    1,753
    Thanked
    4266

    Default


    Excellent shots jsp! Bet you're glad you visited here now :)

  9. #16
    Join Date
    November 2008
    Location
    gt yarmouth
    Posts
    3,466
    Thanked
    1595

    Default


    Aha....seem to recognise this one rather well. My locale I believe!... May just have to return! Great bw shots, lends to the melancholy!
    And a dreadful thing from the cliff did spring. And its wild bark thrilled around. His eyes had the glow of the fires below. Twas the form of the Spectre Hound. 'Ha' yer fa'r got a dickey, bor?' 'Yis, an' he want a fule ter roide 'im, will yew cum?'

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Similar Threads

  1. Holiday shack..norfolk
    By Mikeymutt in forum Rural Sites
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 26th Mar 17, 22:05
  2. The Holiday Shack
    By sureshank in forum Misc Sites
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 1st Dec 16, 20:44
  3. Wacky Shack (aka Love Shack) - Nov '15
    By UrbanX in forum Rural Sites
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 1st Dec 15, 10:44
  4. The Holiday Shack
    By Rubex in forum Residential Sites
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 11th Sep 15, 08:05
  5. The love shack
    By Mikeymutt in forum Rural Sites
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 28th Aug 15, 09:21

About us
DerelictPlaces is a forum for people with an interest in the history and documentation of disused, derelict and abandoned buildings to come together and share their experiences, photography and historical findings. Our military, industrial and historical heritage is fast disappearing under the pressure of regeneration, the need for new housing, and often through simple neglect; Our aim is to document these places before they disappear entirely.
Follow us