DSLR/Mirrorless Camera Christmas

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I've noticed that a lot of stores/dealers are running specials for Christmas.

Is anyone getting a new DSLR/Mirrorless Camera?

I was looking on Amazon UK and some of these are quite pricey. Any thoughts?
 
All depends on how much you want to pay and what manufacturer you like. I have used Canon for years and bought an EOS R6 when it came out but it was expensive and if you buy the L Lenses even more so. I get the STM lenses as they are good enough for what I do.
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The best site for it is Camera Price Buster - Compare UK Stock Prices

It updates several times a day with prices from most genuine UK retailers. Plus for each item it has a price tracker so you can see how the current price compares with recent prices, to make sure you're not getting the kind of fake deal that most sales are famous for.
 
All depends on how much you want to pay and what manufacturer you like. I have used Canon for years and bought an EOS R6 when it came out but it was expensive and if you buy the L Lenses even more so. I get the STM lenses as they are good enough for what I do.
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As I understand it, with a mirrorless camera you still look through a viewfinder as you do with an SLR, but what you see is an electronic version of what the lens sees. Is that correct? And how does it compare in resolution with an SLR's optical version?
Is the mirrorless camera more compact than the equivalent SLR?
 
As I understand it, with a mirrorless camera you still look through a viewfinder as you do with an SLR, but what you see is an electronic version of what the lens sees. Is that correct? And how does it compare in resolution with an SLR's optical version?
Is the mirrorless camera more compact than the equivalent SLR?
I think there are some mirrorless that have no viewfinder so you just use the screen on the back. Mind you I have seen a lot of people doing this. I think mine very similar to my old DSLR, I can't remember about the SLR,s I had. It is no more compact than the old DSLR's like the EOS 70D I had though mine does seem smaller that the EOS 6D I cannot compare the weights. It does have a lot of fetures on it I'll never use.
 
While we are on cameras I am going to be cheeky and ask if any one is interested in a sling back camera backpack. I have two one smaller that the other which I have used and it great for taking on explores or treks the second is a bit bigger and can hold a small tripod, I have never really used it. The red one takes a DSLR and lens the green one a bit more. £10 for the small one and £20 for the bigger one. PM me if you are interested.
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While we are on cameras I am going to be cheeky and ask if any one is interested in a sling back camera backpack. I have two one smaller that the other which I have used and it great for taking on explores or treks the second is a bit bigger and can hold a small tripod, I have never really used it. The red one takes a DSLR and lens the green one a bit more. £10 for the small one and £20 for the bigger one. PM me if you are interested.
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That's a bargain!

Shame I've already got nearly a dozen here and I'm currently eyeing up another one that's big enough to accommodate a recent lens purchase. Oops.
 
Thanks for the info. Apart from the moment when the mirror is raised in an SLR, what are the advantages of a mirrorless camera? Apart from the possible smaller size.
 
Thanks for the info. Apart from the moment when the mirror is raised in an SLR, what are the advantages of a mirrorless camera? Apart from the possible smaller size.

The only real major benefit is the on-sensor AF rather than having a separate AF module. In practice, this means that AF should always be spot on, without having to calibrate lenses individually.

I find the whole EVF vs OVF thing a bit of a misnomer in terms of debate. It's more down to personal preference and in a lot of cases it depends on what you're shooting. There are some things that I prefer EVF for and others that having an OVF actually makes a massive difference, especially in terms of battery life.

In terms of size/weight most of it boils down to physics. To resolve an image on a given size sensor it's down the the optics and lens design rather than the actual camera body. Some manufacturers have managed to start making smaller lenses thanks to the shorter flange distances involved, but when you look at the overall system weights (i.e. cameras, lenses, batteries etc) there's virtually nothing in it.

Overall, while the jump from film SLR to DSLR was revolutionary, the jump to mirrorless is just evolutionary at this stage.

(I use both, BTW.)
 
I might add that the big manufacturers and phasing out DSLR production in favour of Mirror-less Canon are really going into it now with the R systems. I think Nikon are doing the same, Sony and Panasonic were the first from what I could see
 
The only real major benefit is the on-sensor AF rather than having a separate AF module. In practice, this means that AF should always be spot on, without having to calibrate lenses individually.

I find the whole EVF vs OVF thing a bit of a misnomer in terms of debate. It's more down to personal preference and in a lot of cases it depends on what you're shooting. There are some things that I prefer EVF for and others that having an OVF actually makes a massive difference, especially in terms of battery life.

In terms of size/weight most of it boils down to physics. To resolve an image on a given size sensor it's down the the optics and lens design rather than the actual camera body. Some manufacturers have managed to start making smaller lenses thanks to the shorter flange distances involved, but when you look at the overall system weights (i.e. cameras, lenses, batteries etc) there's virtually nothing in it.

Overall, while the jump from film SLR to DSLR was revolutionary, the jump to mirrorless is just evolutionary at this stage.

(I use both, BTW.)
Thanks for your reply. Since I have my Canon 400D and my 5D, it is very unlikely that I will buy a mirrorless. I can see that not having moving parts inside the camera
body is also a benefit. And I agree that the change to mirrorless is a large one. Your liking for either EVF or OVF depends on what? Subject matter? Or perhaps lighting
conditions? You mention battery life. Which gives the longer battery life? I can see that the EVF is using battery power all the time the camera is switched on. Is there a difference to how quickly a lens set to AF focusses? Especially in low light or non-contrasty situations?
 
Battery life is no good on mine but then I take both RAW & JPG so that does kill it a bit my old 70D took over 1000 as JPG but I feel as I was useing full frame i would be better saving the image as both RAW & JPG. If your OK with JPG then I would think mine would take around 700 images. I use two batteries and am about to get a third
 
Battery life is no good on mine but then I take both RAW & JPG so that does kill it a bit my old 70D took over 1000 as JPG but I feel as I was useing full frame i would be better saving the image as both RAW & JPG. If your OK with JPG then I would think mine would take around 700 images. I use two batteries and am about to get a third
For my 400D I use a screw-on battery pack that has its built-in rechargeable battery which gives a good battery life, even when using the 400D's built-in flash on some shots. For the 5D I use a screw-on adaptor that takes two of the Canon normal rechargeable batteries. Since I have four batteries, I take the other two charged up as spares - and get good life from the set-up. I also tend to save in both RAW and JPEG - so that I can convert the RAW to TIFF for maximum detail.
 
For my 400D I use a screw-on battery pack that has its built-in rechargeable battery which gives a good battery life, even when using the 400D's built-in flash on some shots. For the 5D I use a screw-on adaptor that takes two of the Canon normal rechargeable batteries. Since I have four batteries, I take the other two charged up as spares - and get good life from the set-up. I also tend to save in both RAW and JPEG - so that I can convert the RAW to TIFF for maximum detail.
my mates sony is unbelievable for battery life, I dont think Iv ever seen him change it in a day but I get through 2 or 3 in a average day on my 7d mk2
 
Your liking for either EVF or OVF depends on what? Subject matter? Or perhaps lighting
conditions? You mention battery life. Which gives the longer battery life? I can see that the EVF is using battery power all the time the camera is switched on. Is there a difference to how quickly a lens set to AF focusses? Especially in low light or non-contrasty situations?

A little bit of both really. For wildlife I definitely prefer OVF, as you can spend hours just staring through the viewfinder scoping things out. If doing this with mirrorless you have to keep waking up the viewfinder, and there's a little lag with it coming on too. I also find the D850 focusses far more quickly and accurately on birds in flight than the Z6 does, with the same lens.

For shooting buildings I've always preferred using the screen anyway, so it doesn't really matter if your camera has a viewfinder at all in those situations.

As for AF speed, it depends on how well practiced you are with the AF system of the camera you're using essentially. I cut my teeth in photography shooting mountain biking on a D70, so became very familiar with which AF settings got the best results in a whole variety of lighting conditions and speeds of subject matter. The best results will almost always be had when using the fewest AF-points as the camera has to do less processing, but obviously to do that with fast moving subjects you have to know your subjects movements before they're even in frame and how they're going to be composed within the frame for the photo you have in mind too. When using auto modes such as subject detection (eye, face, animal, car etc) mirrorless systems have been pushing the envelope here but ultimately they're still a crutch, and not as fast as using well practiced technique. When using auto modes I find the mirrorless does grab faces more quickly, it's not a particular game changer but it does make it easier not having to think about AF point positioning in some situations.

In low light they seem to focus equally well, however I can find what I see in the EVF to be a bit misleading at times in terms of exposure. Because it always tries to make sure that you can see the image equally well in all lighting conditions, in low light the image you see in the viewfinder can appear very bright and it's not until you clock what the meter is reading that you realise how dark it is or how high it's boosted your ISO. Looking through an OVF you always know what you're looking at, so it's easier to judge your exposure.

I can get about 40-50% of the number of shots on mirrorless than I can on DSLR with the same battery in the same shooting conditions. I can say that confidently as both my Z6 and D850 take the exact same battery, so for fairness sake I tried it out with a brand new battery so that I knew the battery age wasn't affecting anything. Obviously older batteries will not charge to as high a capacity as a brand new one, which is where making a comparison between DSLR and mirrorless can often be tricky if people are comparing a new mirrorless camera with an older DSLR.
 

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