Horologists House - Coventry - July 19

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BikinGlynn

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Domestic with a daft code name but a bit of a difference this one. dont know any history about this place but most of the downstairs has been used for the prev occupants for watch & clock renovation & repairs leaving a treasure trove of goodies to plough through.



Didnt have anywhere enough time in here tbh but here is the best of what I got.

































 

Hayman

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What a slice of our industrial/mechanical history. The contents would make a small museum by themselves. In the 1950s a family friend was the local watch and clock repairer with a shop in the town. Looking at the photo here of the four-jar electric parts cleaner reminded me of the one he had. The watch or clock parts were put into cleaning fluid (probably carbon tetrachloride) in a glass jar which sat on a vibrating base. As with the one here, it was mains powered, and just a few minutes were needed to separate any dirt clinging to the brass and steel gears wheels, etc. I'm not sure what "Domestic with a daft code name but a bit of a difference this one" means. Does it refer to the term "horologist" (a watch or clock maker) or the "Camp" coffee name? In the days before coffee powder (now coffee granules), Camp coffee (a liquid mixture of coffee and chicory created by CAMbell Paterson - CAMP? - of R. Paterson & Son in Glasgow.) was just about the only instant coffee available. It was sold in strong bottles, was concentrated, saved space, needed just a few drops per cup or mug - and was used when camping. It did what it said on the bottle. As a Boy Scout, I used it. When on picnics, my family used it. Both the Camp coffee box and the house's contents happily took me back in time.
 

BikinGlynn

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What a slice of our industrial/mechanical history. The contents would make a small museum by themselves. In the 1950s a family friend was the local watch and clock repairer with a shop in the town. Looking at the photo here of the four-jar electric parts cleaner reminded me of the one he had. The watch or clock parts were put into cleaning fluid (probably carbon tetrachloride) in a glass jar which sat on a vibrating base. As with the one here, it was mains powered, and just a few minutes were needed to separate any dirt clinging to the brass and steel gears wheels, etc. I'm not sure what "Domestic with a daft code name but a bit of a difference this one" means. Does it refer to the term "horologist" (a watch or clock maker) or the "Camp" coffee name? In the days before coffee powder (now coffee granules), Camp coffee (a liquid mixture of coffee and chicory created by CAMbell Paterson - CAMP? - of R. Paterson & Son in Glasgow.) was just about the only instant coffee available. It was sold in strong bottles, was concentrated, saved space, needed just a few drops per cup or mug - and was used when camping. It did what it said on the bottle. As a Boy Scout, I used it. When on picnics, my family used it. Both the Camp coffee box and the house's contents happily took me back in time.
Interesting research there
 

verdigris

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Domestic with a daft code name but a bit of a difference this one. dont know any history about this place but most of the downstairs has been used for the prev occupants for watch & clock renovation & repairs leaving a treasure trove of goodies to plough through.



Didnt have anywhere enough time in here tbh but here is the best of what I got.

































 

sadlerwells

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Camp coffee (a liquid mixture of coffee and chicory created by CAMbell Paterson - CAMP? - of R. Paterson & Son in Glasgow.) was just about the only instant coffee available. It was sold in strong bottles, was concentrated, saved space, needed just a few drops per cup or mug - and was used when camping. It did what it said on the bottle. As a Boy Scout, I used it. When on picnics, my family used it. Both the Camp coffee box and the house's contents happily took me back in time.
The name ‘Campbell’ has a ‘p’ in it, which I guess leads to the name of the coffee. I think it’s a marmite item, love it or hate it! When we were camping out while renovating a semi-derelict house I got to quite enjoy it.
Interesting house contents whatever.
 

Hayman

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The name ‘Campbell’ has a ‘p’ in it, which I guess leads to the name of the coffee. I think it’s a marmite item, love it or hate it! When we were camping out while renovating a semi-derelict house I got to quite enjoy it.
Interesting house contents whatever.
Sorry, I'm going for a 'p' now (with apologies to Carry On Camping). I agree about the ‘Marmite’ factor. I’m a Bovril man. Another childhod picnic memory is of Eiffel Tower lemonade crystals. I've just found this online, about them: "Yes and I have one of the bottles now that I found in a garden clearance along with Camp coffee bottles in the thick green glass and lots of old Shipham's paste jars, Panyan pickle etc". All of the same era.
 

sj9966

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Nice, it's been totally cleared now, all the stuff inside ended up in an antiques shop not too far away. They had first dibs on everything as they had done a deal with the clearance company.
 

Richard Davies

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Camp coffee is still around even with instant coffee being easily available, just like Vesta currys & Fray Bentos pies in a tin.
 

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