Standish Hospital - Sept 19

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BikinGlynn

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Standish Hospital was a specialist orthopaedics, rheumatology and respiratory care National Health Service (NHS) hospital, located in the hamlet of Standish, Gloucestershire, England. The building was originally a private country house.

Below Standish Wood, which was acquired by the National Trust in 1931, lies Standish Park, which has existed since the 16th century. Originally part of Standish Court, the Park covered 250 acres (100 ha), and was part of the estate of the Baron's Sherborne of Gloucestershire. Developing the Park as a country retreat, Standish House was constructed on the property.



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This is a big one Im afraid. Considering this was an impromptu explore we spent an age here & managed to access the whole place with no issues despite the on site security so thats as far as Ill bore u with the explore details.

so the first part here concentrates on the fabulous deco C1 & 2 wards & Orthoipedic clinic. This was prob my fave block, the natural decay was excellent.



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In 1853, James Dutton, 3rd Baron Sherborne leased it to Gloucester-based businessman Richard Potter, son of Radical MP Richard Potter, then a director of timber merchants Price & Co., later the managing director of the Great Western Railway. Potter lived at the house with his wife Lawrencina, daughter of a Liverpool-based merchant, and their nine daughters. Three were born in the property, including later sociologist, economist, socialist and social reformer Martha Beatrice Webb, Lady Passfield



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Potter developed the gardens along with managed Victorian era principles, building extensive heated greenhouses to allow the family to eat well. It eventually provided a ready supply of grapes, plus a dedicated mushroom house and watercress beds. A drilled spring provided a steady year-round stream, which was landscaped to provide a pond by the construction of a brick wall dam. Beneath the dam there was an ice store, allowing year-round supplies of ice.

Standish Lodge, which marks the entrance of Standish Park and Standish House
In 1882, Lawrencina died and the remaining family members moved out, with Richard moving to Box House in Minchinhampton, where he died on 1 January 1892.





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On 24 June 1884, Mrs. Annie Poole King of Kensington House, Brislington, Somerset leased Standish House on a contract term of 21 years from Edward Dutton, 4th Baron Sherborne, at a rate of £150pa. The widow of a shipping magnate, she moved in with five children, plus a house staff of a coachman, cook, housekeeper, and gardener. A member of the Berkeley Hunt, at the time the house had a stable block capable of housing 30+ horses.

The outbreak of the Boer War reduced global shipping rates, and particularly the rand, which greatly affected Mrs. King's income. In 1897 the family left the house, and downsized with their entire staff to Newark Park at Ozleworth, Wotton-under-Edge







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In 1914 the house was unoccupied and Lord Sherborne, after having been approached by Mary King, not only lent it for use as a Red Cross Hospital but also agreed to have the whole inside painted. It was fitted with electric light and the baths and sanitary accommodation was improved. Standish House Hospital opened as a British Red Cross hospital under the management of Mary King on 13 May 1915. There were 100 beds within the house and 8 fully trained nursing sisters. The rest of the staff was all local volunteers. Patients were wounded soldiers from all over the country. A total of 2,292 sick and wounded soldiers were treated at the hospital during the First World War



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After the war living conditions were very poor which led to a rise in diseases such as tuberculosis. The Government and Local Authorities had a duty to try to improve people's health and so it was proposed that Standish should be opened as a Tuberculosis Institution. Gloucestershire County Council bought Standish Park in its entirety from Lord Sherborne. The house was turned into a sanatorium to treat tuberculosis in 1922.

Funds were raised for suitable equipment and refurbishing, the Red Cross contributing £10,000. Standish House Sanatorium was opened on 6 July 1922. It had a total of 140 beds divided into men's, women's and children's blocks. The wards were run to a strict timetable but there were also plenty of recreation activities including a jazz band, cinema, games, and concerts. Over the next 15 years, the accommodation was expanded and in 1939 a new men's block was opened. During the Second World War expansion slowed but, despite this, in 1947, "C" block, with 65 female beds, 19 children's beds and a modern Physiotherapy Department was opened



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On to the slightly newer childrens block, still of a lovely deco design.

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History - continued
In 1948 the hospital became part of the National Health Service and a new X-Ray Department was opened. As tuberculosis became less common the range of conditions treated at the hospital grew. It specialized in orthopaedics, rheumatology and respiratory care across the whole of Gloucestershire.[1] In this role, it undertook joint replacements, as well as caring for coal miners from the Forest of Dean with the most serious of respiratory problems.[3] In 1953 the name was changed to Standish House Chest Hospital.[10]

In 1956 the League of Friends for Standish Hospital was formed which organized fundraising and additional amenities for patients and visitors. The hospital continued to develop its service including Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy

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n 1974 the NHS had a major reorganization. Standish came under the Gloucestershire Area Health Authority. A new theatre was opened and the X-Ray Dept modernized. During the 1980s more management changes were made and services began to be transferred to Gloucestershire Royal Hospital. Despite new facilities having been built, and protests made by local groups such as "Save Our Standish", in 1992 formal proposals were made to close the hospital.[11]

Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Trust considered reducing the number of beds at the hospital, as part of a series of cost-cutting proposals, in October 2003.[12] Although the Minister for Health, John Hutton, considered several options for the future of the hospital in March 2004,[13] closure was ultimately confirmed and the last patients were ultimately moved to Gloucestershire Royal Hospital in December 2004.

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Moving on to the main house

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In 2006 Standish Mutual Care Trust proposed turning the residual 31 acres (13 ha) site into a centre for health and well being, but were out-bid by a private healthcare concern.[14] Then in 2010 Gloucestershire County Council proposed a mixed-use redevelopment of the site involving a health and social care centre. The proposed "health campus" would offer supported living options and access to care for the elderly and people with physical and learning disabilities.[15] However, in 2017 PJ Livesey Group, a private developer, proposed redeveloping the site for residential use

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Finally we make our way across this lovely courtyard

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Finally into the morgue

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That will do \I think, thanks for looking
 

Fluffy

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I wish, beyond all else, I'd been into Urban Exploring when this place looked like it does above.

The idea of walking up that driveway to see something that looks as amazing as it does in your pictures, sends a shiver down my spine even now. And the fact I like less than 5 minutes away from here will bug me till the day I die! :D
Knowing it was sat there all those years, before I even knew what UE was. Grr!

If you're ever in the area again BG, it'd be great to meet you man. Long been an admirer of your Explores.

Great report.
 

BikinGlynn

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I wish, beyond all else, I'd been into Urban Exploring when this place looked like it does above.

The idea of walking up that driveway to see something that looks as amazing as it does in your pictures, sends a shiver down my spine even now. And the fact I like less than 5 minutes away from here will bug me till the day I die! :D
Knowing it was sat there all those years, before I even knew what UE was. Grr!

If you're ever in the area again BG, it'd be great to meet you man. Long been an admirer of your Explores.

Great report.

Thanks Fluffy, this was barely a year ago so surprised u missed it.
It was just an offchance stop for us but was certainly well worth it
 

Fluffy

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Thanks Fluffy, this was barely a year ago so surprised u missed it.
It was just an offchance stop for us but was certainly well worth it

By the time I got to have a look around, the diggers had already moved in and started land clearance. I still managed to see the main block, the children's ward and the hydrotherapy pool though, so not a complete loss! ;)
 

Cullum2001

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Love the look of this place, some friends of mine keep an eye out for potential ghost hunt sites. We went to St Crispins here in Northampton but its such a poor state it was too dangerous really. Guessing from the comments that this is now gone or no longer accessible?
 

sadlerwells

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Hard to believe that I went here for many an appointment (X-rays etc) back in the 80s. Thank you for documenting it so well before it disappeared.
 

Kilted Mac

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Cracking photos and explore Mr BG Sir, nature is taking a real hold on the place, if it is left for a few years more it will be covered over ! Glad to see the "Graff" menaces haven't been at work yet. Amazing and very clever though some of them are they are a blight on old buildings.
 

BikinGlynn

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Cracking photos and explore Mr BG Sir, nature is taking a real hold on the place, if it is left for a few years more it will be covered over ! Glad to see the "Graff" menaces haven't been at work yet. Amazing and very clever though some of them are they are a blight on old buildings.
Think most of it will of gone by now
 

Darklldo

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I am still reeling at the thought that this was a private country house! Even with a family of ten children I cannot imagine what they did with all those rooms. Just imagine calling everyone to dinner, and where do you start looking if one of the ten is missing?
I have to assume they did a lot of entertaining.
The photos are fantastic and give a very clear picture of how the place was finally developed as a hospital. Now, that I can understand as then they had nursing stations throughout the place for the various health condition they handled.
Thank you, a very great tour and of historical interest :)
 

BikinGlynn

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I am still reeling at the thought that this was a private country house! Even with a family of ten children I cannot imagine what they did with all those rooms. Just imagine calling everyone to dinner, and where do you start looking if one of the ten is missing?
I have to assume they did a lot of entertaining.
The photos are fantastic and give a very clear picture of how the place was finally developed as a hospital. Now, that I can understand as then they had nursing stations throughout the place for the various health condition they handled.
Thank you, a very great tour and of historical interest :)
Thanks for the comments. I believe the main house is listed & therefore should be saved, but no doubt will never look the same in the middle of new housing estate!
 

DanMoist

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In 2020 I visited this site regularly. Access was easy then since they had started selected demolition of various parts. Security has gradually improved and many of the good parts have gone.
 

Hayman

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I am still reeling at the thought that this was a private country house! Even with a family of ten children I cannot imagine what they did with all those rooms. Just imagine calling everyone to dinner, and where do you start looking if one of the ten is missing?
I have to assume they did a lot of entertaining.
The photos are fantastic and give a very clear picture of how the place was finally developed as a hospital. Now, that I can understand as then they had nursing stations throughout the place for the various health condition they handled.
Thank you, a very great tour and of historical interest :)
As for the size of the "private country house", Dan Moist's photo – showing the building with all the scaffolding – suggests it had an extension at some time, or even extensions; perhaps after it ceased to be a family dwelling.

Since a number of the derelict sites visited by members are what were once "private country houses", here is the layout of my main childhood home, one such 1880- built private country house that my parents ran a guest house.

Ground floor - entrance hall, drawing room (lounge), dining room, conservatory with heating pipes to prevent frost, boiler room with boiler to heat conservatory, morning room, butler's pantry, side room, lavatory, kitchen, larder, back kitchen, another small room (use unknown, perhaps a store room or an office), coal/coke store, feed room for owner's carriage horses.

Cellars - cool stores for apples and other fruits, further coal and firewood stores, large room possibly games room for the children or a utility room since it had a tiled floor with a drain in the middle.

First floor front (for the family) - master bedroom, dressing room, bathroom, second main bedroom, three smaller bedrooms, small bedroom above dressing room, perhaps for nanny.

First floor rear (partly for the servants) – lavatory, bathroom, largish bedroom, two small bedrooms, games room.

Separate from the main house was the stable block. The ground floor accomodated the owner's carriage, with the tack room, and loose boxes for the four carriage horses. The length of the first floor comprised the flat for the coachman and his family and groom(s).

There was a large kitchen garden with a wall along one side for wall fruit. Also a large greenhouse.

And there was a grape vine house.

The grounds consisted of the main lawn, a side lawn, tennis court, paddock for the horses to graze, an apple orchard, and a large chicken run to supply both eggs and freshly killed chickens.

A wooden coach house was halfway down the 100 yard drive.

As for staff, there would have been the cook and under cooks, butler, maids, coachman and grooms and gardeners.

James Hamlyn who had the place built in 1880 for himself and his future family was married to Sarah Petrie in 1874. Records show they had seven children, born between 1887 and 1905.
 

jimmy0161

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Standish Hospital was a specialist orthopaedics, rheumatology and respiratory care National Health Service (NHS) hospital, located in the hamlet of Standish, Gloucestershire, England. The building was originally a private country house.

Below Standish Wood, which was acquired by the National Trust in 1931, lies Standish Park, which has existed since the 16th century. Originally part of Standish Court, the Park covered 250 acres (100 ha), and was part of the estate of the Baron's Sherborne of Gloucestershire. Developing the Park as a country retreat, Standish House was constructed on the property.



View attachment 263086



This is a big one Im afraid. Considering this was an impromptu explore we spent an age here & managed to access the whole place with no issues despite the on site security so thats as far as Ill bore u with the explore details.

so the first part here concentrates on the fabulous deco C1 & 2 wards & Orthoipedic clinic. This was prob my fave block, the natural decay was excellent.



View attachment 263087



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In 1853, James Dutton, 3rd Baron Sherborne leased it to Gloucester-based businessman Richard Potter, son of Radical MP Richard Potter, then a director of timber merchants Price & Co., later the managing director of the Great Western Railway. Potter lived at the house with his wife Lawrencina, daughter of a Liverpool-based merchant, and their nine daughters. Three were born in the property, including later sociologist, economist, socialist and social reformer Martha Beatrice Webb, Lady Passfield



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Potter developed the gardens along with managed Victorian era principles, building extensive heated greenhouses to allow the family to eat well. It eventually provided a ready supply of grapes, plus a dedicated mushroom house and watercress beds. A drilled spring provided a steady year-round stream, which was landscaped to provide a pond by the construction of a brick wall dam. Beneath the dam there was an ice store, allowing year-round supplies of ice.

Standish Lodge, which marks the entrance of Standish Park and Standish House
In 1882, Lawrencina died and the remaining family members moved out, with Richard moving to Box House in Minchinhampton, where he died on 1 January 1892.





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On 24 June 1884, Mrs. Annie Poole King of Kensington House, Brislington, Somerset leased Standish House on a contract term of 21 years from Edward Dutton, 4th Baron Sherborne, at a rate of £150pa. The widow of a shipping magnate, she moved in with five children, plus a house staff of a coachman, cook, housekeeper, and gardener. A member of the Berkeley Hunt, at the time the house had a stable block capable of housing 30+ horses.

The outbreak of the Boer War reduced global shipping rates, and particularly the rand, which greatly affected Mrs. King's income. In 1897 the family left the house, and downsized with their entire staff to Newark Park at Ozleworth, Wotton-under-Edge







View attachment 263096



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In 1914 the house was unoccupied and Lord Sherborne, after having been approached by Mary King, not only lent it for use as a Red Cross Hospital but also agreed to have the whole inside painted. It was fitted with electric light and the baths and sanitary accommodation was improved. Standish House Hospital opened as a British Red Cross hospital under the management of Mary King on 13 May 1915. There were 100 beds within the house and 8 fully trained nursing sisters. The rest of the staff was all local volunteers. Patients were wounded soldiers from all over the country. A total of 2,292 sick and wounded soldiers were treated at the hospital during the First World War



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After the war living conditions were very poor which led to a rise in diseases such as tuberculosis. The Government and Local Authorities had a duty to try to improve people's health and so it was proposed that Standish should be opened as a Tuberculosis Institution. Gloucestershire County Council bought Standish Park in its entirety from Lord Sherborne. The house was turned into a sanatorium to treat tuberculosis in 1922.

Funds were raised for suitable equipment and refurbishing, the Red Cross contributing £10,000. Standish House Sanatorium was opened on 6 July 1922. It had a total of 140 beds divided into men's, women's and children's blocks. The wards were run to a strict timetable but there were also plenty of recreation activities including a jazz band, cinema, games, and concerts. Over the next 15 years, the accommodation was expanded and in 1939 a new men's block was opened. During the Second World War expansion slowed but, despite this, in 1947, "C" block, with 65 female beds, 19 children's beds and a modern Physiotherapy Department was opened



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On to the slightly newer childrens block, still of a lovely deco design.

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History - continued
In 1948 the hospital became part of the National Health Service and a new X-Ray Department was opened. As tuberculosis became less common the range of conditions treated at the hospital grew. It specialized in orthopaedics, rheumatology and respiratory care across the whole of Gloucestershire.[1] In this role, it undertook joint replacements, as well as caring for coal miners from the Forest of Dean with the most serious of respiratory problems.[3] In 1953 the name was changed to Standish House Chest Hospital.[10]

In 1956 the League of Friends for Standish Hospital was formed which organized fundraising and additional amenities for patients and visitors. The hospital continued to develop its service including Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy

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n 1974 the NHS had a major reorganization. Standish came under the Gloucestershire Area Health Authority. A new theatre was opened and the X-Ray Dept modernized. During the 1980s more management changes were made and services began to be transferred to Gloucestershire Royal Hospital. Despite new facilities having been built, and protests made by local groups such as "Save Our Standish", in 1992 formal proposals were made to close the hospital.[11]

Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Trust considered reducing the number of beds at the hospital, as part of a series of cost-cutting proposals, in October 2003.[12] Although the Minister for Health, John Hutton, considered several options for the future of the hospital in March 2004,[13] closure was ultimately confirmed and the last patients were ultimately moved to Gloucestershire Royal Hospital in December 2004.

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Moving on to the main house

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In 2006 Standish Mutual Care Trust proposed turning the residual 31 acres (13 ha) site into a centre for health and well being, but were out-bid by a private healthcare concern.[14] Then in 2010 Gloucestershire County Council proposed a mixed-use redevelopment of the site involving a health and social care centre. The proposed "health campus" would offer supported living options and access to care for the elderly and people with physical and learning disabilities.[15] However, in 2017 PJ Livesey Group, a private developer, proposed redeveloping the site for residential use

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Finally we make our way across this lovely courtyard

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Finally into the morgue

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That will do \I think, thanks for looking
Good shots
 
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