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Thread: Wheal Grenville, near Camborne

  1. #1
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    Default Wheal Grenville, near Camborne


    Some photographs that I took at Fortescue's Shaft at Wheal Grenville Mine near Camborne last week.

    Wheal Grenville began to be worked in the 1820s though it was not productive until the 1850s, at which time the South and East mines were worked independently. In 1906 these mines were united with South Condurrow to form the Grenville United Mines and continued in operation until 1920. There was an abortive attempt to reopen the mine in the 1960s. The engine houses were consolidated in the mid-1990s as part of the Mineral Tramways Project.




    The 90 inch pumping engine house at Fortescue's Shaft. The engine was built by Harvey & Co and removed from the house in 1922 for reuse at New Cooks Kitchen Shaft at South Crofty Mine.


    Note the sole plate and stools remaining from the 90 inch engine removed in 1922 on the "bob wall"



    Rear of the 90 inch pumping engine house. There was an attempt to reopen the mine in the 1960s.





    The Fortescue's Shaft whim (winding) engine house.



    View through the whim engine house showing the cylinder bed stone in the foreground.



    View to the pumping engine house



    Wall detail of the whim engine house at Fortescue's Shaft - note the wall plate "Tavistock Iron Works". The origins of the engine removed from this house in the late 1920s is not clear though it might have been constructed at Tavistock Iron Works.



    Photo of the Whim Engine house with HDR and super black and white filters applied!



    This is believed to be the foundation of the engine which powered a small crushing plant. The main stamps were located at the New Stamps engine house visible in the distance. The New Stamps engine powered a battery of 136 heads of Cornish Stamps.



    The New Stamps Engine House - The New Stamps engine powered a battery of 136 heads of Cornish Stamps.



    General view of the two engine houses at Fortescue's Shaft

    For a full collection of photos taken of Wheal Grenville on April 07 click here:

    http://www.jhluxton.com/Industrial-A...eal-Grenville/

    For pictures of other Cornwall and Devon Mining sites click here:

    http://www.jhluxton.com/Industrial-A...Devon-Cornwall

    John
    www.jhluxton.com Transport, Industrial History and other Photography
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/jhluxton/ Flickr Photostream

  2. Thanks given by: airfix, ajarb, Colorado Brother, flyboys90, Hugh Jorgan, HughieD, Luise, Mearing, oldscrote, Rubex, tazong, thorfrun, trainman
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  4. #2
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    You got some really great shots :)

  5. #3
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    Smashing mine buildings and ace shots.

  6. #4
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    Thats a little cracker - thanks for sharing

  7. #5
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    Love the black and white pics, some great shots. Thanks for sharing!

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