Tywarnehayle mine commenced working as Wheal Rock c1750, was renamed United Hills in 1809, and later again as Tywarnehayle. From 1907 it was used as London's Royal School of Mines training mine, specialising in surveying and timber preservation. There are several surviving engine houses. At SW 6975 4726 is Taylor's pump engine house with a detached stack. The building housed a 58-inch diameter wooden beam engine, the last to be built in Cornwall. In 1906 the first electric pump to be used on a Cornish mine was installed here. Also present at SW 6999 4722 is John's pump engine house which was built in 1861 to house a 70-inch diameter engine. The engine was moved to Wheal Uny in 1864. These photographs were taken on an explore of the site in May 1990 therefore things may have changed and it has probably been tidied up!




Taylor's Shaft (Wheal Rock) Engine House reputedly to be one of the oldest surviing Cornish Engine Houses which housed a beam engine with a wooden beam which operated through the narrow slot opening at the top.



Interior of Taylor's Shaft Beam Engine House



Taylor's Shaft (Wheal Rock) Engine House reputedly to be one of the oldest surviing Cornish Engine Houses which housed a beam engine with a wooden beam which operated through the narrow slot opening at the top. John's Shaft Enging House can be seen top right.





Views of John's Shaft engine house built to accommodated a 70 inch engine in 1861. However, it was taken to Wheal Uny in 1864. The house having a very short working life.





John's Shaft engine house viewed from the rear looking up to the bob wall.



One of the buildings which are associated with the Royal School of Mines near James' Shaft which is marked by the metal frame. The upturned concrete foundations appear to date from the 20th Century reworking of the mine.



James' Shaft



Gardiner's Shaft used as an access point by the Royal School of Mines

Full gallery of Images at: http://www.jhluxton.com/The-35mm-Fil...Mine-Cornwall/

John