Wolsingham Depot - Dec 2020

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UrbandonedTeam

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Wolsingham Train Depot

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Taken from the window of the also abandoned Wolsingham steelworks offices.

The history of this place is quite fascinating and we only found out how historic the property is after visiting.

Charles Attwood founded an iron works in Wolsingham and patented a new method of steelmaking. The Ironworks were a major employer in Wolsingham from 1864, producing steel from Weardale iron ore. When Charles Attwood died his nephew took over the company and traded as John Rogerson & Co until 1930. Steel castings were produced for use in both shipbuilding and munitions. The firm made a major contribution to the war effort in both World Wars. Electric arc furnaces were installed around 1950 but trade declined and the works closed in 1984. Manufacture continued for a time on a smaller scale run by a workers cooperative. It appears that the train depot was built during the steelworks period of use, as a building without that purpose. It may have been converted as the factory grew in size and a railway was necessary, but it's final use was a train depot. The ironworks finally closed in 2008 and was demolished, leaving some offices on the roadside behind and the transport shed.

51089509894_ed392d14f4_c.jpg


We had seen this one online as another 'secret spot' and had reason to believe it was up north. It did take a while with minimal externals, but one Winter night, I spent a good few hours tracking it down and wanted to go right away. It didn't seem like the sort of place that would remain lacking in vandalism in the UK, and also was quite special. Before the lockdown, we headed up there for sunrise and everything went swimmingly, spending way too long inside for the open space available.

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Immediately inside, you can see why this place is out of the ordinary. Not taking away from the 60s-80s trains, the building itself is very dated and contains some nice architecture.

The blue Mark 2 car that snaked over the two lanes in the shed.

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The front cabin of the Mark 2, beside an old brake van.

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Inside the Mark 2.

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Mail compartment.

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Cabin.

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Further up the train, it began to get slightly more stripped and decayed. The buffet car was difficult to walk through with seats and cushions piled on the floor.

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Heading towards the red Mark 1 at the north end of the shed. We were very intrigued to see what lay inside this one, due to the first class signs on every window and the older style of design.

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A private booth inside. Sadly, this older carriage was only one car long.

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Note the decorative throws on each seat and the ornate light fittings.

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Following a look inside each train that wasn't freight, the rest of our time here was spent on the various gantry walkways that run parallel all the way along the tracks as well as on the roof of the trains. The two options definitely gave the best view of the site.

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51088390532_188857247e_b.jpg


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A little wholesome picture to finish with.

Here is the link to our documentary styled video filmed at the transport shed. We cover the building's past, present and future through cinematics and narration:

https://youtu.be/6o0smjGAAao

Thanks for reading :)
 

wolfism

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Great photos, wouldn't mind seeing this some time as I was lucky enough to see Weardale Steel before it got demolished in 2008/9. There were big casting pits in the floor for keel posts and similar components for ships, plus a giant electric furnace to re-melt the steel. My first visit but the second trip for the friend I went with, unfortunately in the interim they'd had lots of hassle with metal thieves and had fitted CCTV/PIR's inside the shed, so we got turfed out by a very twitchy young security guard. At that time there were lots more locos sitting outside the train shed at the Weardale Railway too.
 

yvettelancaster

Active member
Joined
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Messages
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Wolsingham Train Depot

51088390137_f09b0a5711_b.jpg


Taken from the window of the also abandoned Wolsingham steelworks offices.

The history of this place is quite fascinating and we only found out how historic the property is after visiting.

Charles Attwood founded an iron works in Wolsingham and patented a new method of steelmaking. The Ironworks were a major employer in Wolsingham from 1864, producing steel from Weardale iron ore. When Charles Attwood died his nephew took over the company and traded as John Rogerson & Co until 1930. Steel castings were produced for use in both shipbuilding and munitions. The firm made a major contribution to the war effort in both World Wars. Electric arc furnaces were installed around 1950 but trade declined and the works closed in 1984. Manufacture continued for a time on a smaller scale run by a workers cooperative. It appears that the train depot was built during the steelworks period of use, as a building without that purpose. It may have been converted as the factory grew in size and a railway was necessary, but it's final use was a train depot. The ironworks finally closed in 2008 and was demolished, leaving some offices on the roadside behind and the transport shed.

51089509894_ed392d14f4_c.jpg


We had seen this one online as another 'secret spot' and had reason to believe it was up north. It did take a while with minimal externals, but one Winter night, I spent a good few hours tracking it down and wanted to go right away. It didn't seem like the sort of place that would remain lacking in vandalism in the UK, and also was quite special. Before the lockdown, we headed up there for sunrise and everything went swimmingly, spending way too long inside for the open space available.

51088373834_d03aae7e40_b.jpg


51088375619_0925b7b759_b.jpg


Immediately inside, you can see why this place is out of the ordinary. Not taking away from the 60s-80s trains, the building itself is very dated and contains some nice architecture.

The blue Mark 2 car that snaked over the two lanes in the shed.

51088375779_262c9d61c6_b.jpg


51088375694_3c7da3b201_b.jpg


51088375304_aa86f674e8_b.jpg


The front cabin of the Mark 2, beside an old brake van.

51088847328_d494dd5e3e_b.jpg


Inside the Mark 2.

51088391457_5bd0344cd5_b.jpg


51088375084_68064bcde5_b.jpg


Mail compartment.

51088847143_0bc34fc723_b.jpg


Cabin.

51088302976_b08fedbd35_b.jpg


51089113980_51b12dc723_b.jpg


Further up the train, it began to get slightly more stripped and decayed. The buffet car was difficult to walk through with seats and cushions piled on the floor.

51088374809_fe9a2995e8_b.jpg


51088374864_6166030ae5_b.jpg


51088375894_c723678200_b.jpg


Heading towards the red Mark 1 at the north end of the shed. We were very intrigued to see what lay inside this one, due to the first class signs on every window and the older style of design.

51088848293_c17217d91f_b.jpg


51088846248_cd42b2a6f9_b.jpg


51088848568_1ae09671a0_b.jpg


A private booth inside. Sadly, this older carriage was only one car long.

51088848448_95e9aaab5b_b.jpg


51089115490_855ea63ae1_b.jpg


51088304346_2b29b83658_b.jpg


51088304501_7ea3e6c3aa_b.jpg


Note the decorative throws on each seat and the ornate light fittings.

51089115675_67714ffa68_b.jpg


Following a look inside each train that wasn't freight, the rest of our time here was spent on the various gantry walkways that run parallel all the way along the tracks as well as on the roof of the trains. The two options definitely gave the best view of the site.

51088374514_441572d097_b.jpg


51088390532_188857247e_b.jpg


51089113895_caec5600d6_b.jpg


51088846523_ecb77bb542_b.jpg


51088301956_14a4996a56_b.jpg


51089113595_ab8acd8c35_b.jpg


51089113320_462dedaba3_b.jpg


A little wholesome picture to finish with.

Here is the link to our documentary styled video filmed at the transport shed. We cover the building's past, present and future through cinematics and narration:

https://youtu.be/6o0smjGAAao

Thanks for reading :)
Amazing photos a lovely find nice one
 

Hayman

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May 14, 2018
Messages
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What are here called "decorative throws" were derived from "antimacassars". In the Victorian era, men would use oils to hold their hair in place. One very popular oil was macassar oil – named from Makassar in Indonesia, supposedly the source of the main ingredient. To protect all manner of seats from such oils, small cloths were placed over the backs of chairs and seats in various forms of transport, including railway carriages. And they were called “antimacassars”. The practice continued in the UK right up to the time of British Railways and British Rail, generally only latterly in first class compartments.
 

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