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Thread: Culverthorpe Chapel/folly, Lincs, October 2016

  1. #1
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    Default Culverthorpe Chapel/folly, Lincs, October 2016


    Intro:

    Nice little explore this, courtesy of discovering this place via the excellent Google Maps Folly overlay. Wouldn't normally report on something so small but there's a bit of history and quite a few nice architectural details.

    The History:
    The hamlet of Culverthorpe is in south Lincolnshire. It lies approximately 6km south-west of Sleaford and 9km north-east of Grantham. It boasts a Grade I Listed Hall built in the17th century and remodelled in the 18th century. St Bartholomew's Chapel was the former 17th century chapel that was attached to Culverthorpe Hall. The chapel was designed in 1691, possibly by William Stanton, but construction was later circa 1735 when the hall was partially rebuilt. Two trenches dug by excavations show the presence of north and south wall foundations belonging to the chapel's fašade. Built in Limestone ashlar, it remained in use until 1803 following the death of Michael Newton. It was then partially demolished sometime in the 1800s and the building materials salvaged for reuse. It appears that the facade was added to in the 19th century, most probably to create a folly. The site was Grade II listed in January 1990 and described as Culverthorpe Temple. An ambitious Millennium Project to restore the remains of the Tetrastyle Ionic portico, pulvinated frieze and dentillated pediment of former chapel, and to rebuild the chapel on its original site to the east was investigated in March 1999 when the site was surveyed for the owner. However this clearly never came to fruition.

    The Pictures:

    First glimpse through the trees:

    img8076 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    The former walls of the chapel can be seen via the remains of the foundations:

    img8099 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    This is one of the two original end walls:

    img8078 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    img8092 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    The old entrance door:

    img8079 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    img8098 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    Front view:

    img8081 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    And front from the side:

    img8083 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    Centre two columns and entrance door:

    img8096 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    On the front porch looking up:

    img8085 by HughieDW, on Flickr



    img8097 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    On the porch looking down at the column bases:

    img8090 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    One of the ionic pillars:

    img8082 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    Detail of one of the ionic column tops:

    img8080 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    Detail of carving above the door

    img8086 by HughieDW, on Flickr

    img8091 by HughieDW, on Flickr

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    Thanks given by: ajarb, dauntless - UE, flyboys90, Hippie Alien, Hugh Jorgan, krela, Locksley, Mearing, ocelot397, oldscrote, Rubex, The Wombat, thorfrun, tony willett

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  3. #2
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    Default


    Cute that, cheers.

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    Thanks given by: HughieD

  4. #3
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    Default


    Quote Originally Posted by krela View Post
    Cute that, cheers.
    Cheers Krela. Isn't it? Could sit nicely at the bottom of your garden.

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  5. #4
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    Your right Hughie smashing features still here,the porch entrance is a real belter.

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    Thanks given by: HughieD

  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by flyboys90 View Post
    Your right Hughie smashing features still here,the porch entrance is a real belter.
    Cheers Flyboys. You're a gent.

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  7. #6
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    That would make a nice little summer house.
    When the going gets tough - the tough get going.

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    Thanks given by: HughieD

  8. #7
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    Lovely detail. Great photos HughieD :)

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    Thanks given by: HughieD

  9. #8
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    Nice little find that :)
    Black cat exploring company
    & LSD - Leicester Super Derpers

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  10. #9
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    Default


    With these autumnal colours, on the rear side (three first photos), I fancied King Louie passing through the door...

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    Thanks given by: HughieD

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