Two Churches, Scarborough, North Yorks, December 2018

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HughieD

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With the demolition of the Futurist Theatre on Scarborough main drag (saw the giant sized bite out of the hill) Scarborough is a bit of a fallow hunting ground urbex-wise. After a fail at some baths that were sealed and a former fun fair that didn't really deliver came across these two churches in the old town. Again both were sealed tight and don't merit a report in their own right. Together, though, they just about merit a report.

1. St John's Evangelist Church
This interesting brick-built church lies in the back streets around the corner from the Market. It's been abandoned for some time. Did a bit of digging and found a bit of history along with this engraving from The Building News, dated 7th March 1884:

45546232664_3fabb43467_b.jpg20181211_064351 by HughieDW, on Flickr

Located at the corner of Globe and St Sepulchre Streets on land previously occupied by “six low-class dwellings and a beer shop", it began life as the Anglican mission church of St John the Evangelist. The foundation stone was laid by Mrs Blunt, wife of Scarborough’s parish vicar, archdeacon Richard Frederick Lefevre Blunt, on Tuesday March 27th, 1883. The church was built to serve another hitherto-neglected but densely-populated working class area (there were approximately 4,000 residents living in the neighbourhood of St Sepulchre, Leading Post and Dumple Streets). The building cost just over £3,000 to build and opened in October 1884. As referenced in the above engraving, the chief architect was Charles Hodgson Fowler (1840-1910) of Durham who was a specialist in the restoration of medieval church buildings and well-known for his work on Durham cathedral.

The Scarborough Mercury reported that at the end of March 1939 the last Anglican service took place on Easter Sunday. The church then closed down and the building put up for sale. During World War II it was used as a furniture store and then was bought by a gown manufacturer in 1949 for £2,700. In 1956 it was sold on to Bradford-based firm Kamella Ltd to make children’s clothes, only to close down three years later in 1958, with the loss of 33 jobs. In October 1959 the building return to its original usage. Repainted in “Presbyterian blue”, two partitioned school rooms and a kitchen were added. With the consolidation of the Presbyterian Church of England and Congregational Church to form the United Reformed Church two years earlier, the church was vacated in 1974 and again became was abandoned and unoccupied.

St John’s today remains empty and unloved but virtually as it was 130 years later.
An article in the local newspaper from 2010 reporting that the plans for a developer to convert it to two ground floor maisonettes and four upper-floor flats.

Wasn't optimistic on getting inside after checking Streetview on Google Maps. And so it transpired. There was an open letterbox however, but given the whiff of birdpoo and dead pigeons would have declined anyway.


The Pictures:

31311653457_38015cb52c_b.jpgimg9833 by HughieDW, on Flickr

Plenty of nice stone work:

31311677097_121ffac0e3_b.jpgimg9830 by HughieDW, on Flickr

46250808561_212ab4a775_b.jpgimg9829 by HughieDW, on Flickr

46250830101_54ce1efd7f_b.jpgimg9828 by HughieDW, on Flickr

The roof is still in pretty good nick:

45337818725_1db335078d_b.jpgimg9825 by HughieDW, on Flickr

But broken windows means a home for our feathered friends:

32378609138_d24ddc3483_b.jpgimg9826 by HughieDW, on Flickr

A crafty peek through the letter box reveals a sea of pigeon poo (and dead pidgeons):

31311351597_a76bbea2ef_b.jpgScarborough 02 by HughieDW, on Flickr

Anyone know what this is?

31311337217_5dd5f8f108_b.jpgScarborough 03 by HughieDW, on Flickr

2. Eastborough Congregational Church
Eastborough church stands on the site of the oldest non-conformist meeting place in the town. Built in 1701 and only one of three places of worship in the town. The former pentecostal chapel faces onto both Sepulchre Street and Eastborough. It's a long building and the Sepulchre side has been renovated and converted into flats. However the Eastborough side, known as Hannay's chapel, remains empty. With only a dozen resident Presbyterian families in the town, during the summer season crowds of Scottish gentry would swell the congregation. The Rev William Whitaker succeeded Hannay in 1725 and with membership growing the chapel was extended in 1744 and again in 1774. After a number of ministers had come, including Samuel Bottomley (knick-named “Scarborough’s Good Samaritan”) whose ministry ran from 1773 until 1830, the "Old Meeting House" as it had become known, was rebuilt again in 1869 and reopened as Eastborough Congregational church. These alterations left few traces of the original structure. However, the opening of the new Bar Congregational church nearby in 1850 and its extraordinary success under its first minister saw membership for Eastborough fall. After that history gets a little sketchy.

It is currently on the property market with the potential for conversion into two one-bed flats if you have a spare £100,000!. Steps to the left give access to an elevated terrace above the street called Palace Hill.

Under the church victorian tombs containing two hollow stone sarcophagagi were discovered along with two bodies and a wealth of 12th century artefacts.

The façade has the words "Enter into his gates with thanksgiving", a reference to Psalms 100:4.

Less pictures here but some nice stonework externally:

31311323287_68887d62d6_b.jpgScarborough 04 by HughieDW, on Flickr

32378462828_e3f22db571_b.jpgimg9835 by HughieDW, on Flickr

31311586877_86117f7f8a_b.jpgimg9836 by HughieDW, on Flickr

46199849972_47c223c83b_b.jpgimg9837 by HughieDW, on Flickr

32378314728_1d7cca08da_b.jpgimg9838 by HughieDW, on Flickr
 

Hugh Jorgan

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A nice collection. "Anyone know what this is"? object looks like a projector, a reel at the top and bottom but make and model number? I've no idea. Maybe someone else with a previous experience of projectors could shed a light.
 

HughieD

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A nice collection. "Anyone know what this is"? object looks like a projector, a reel at the top and bottom but make and model number? I've no idea. Maybe someone else with a previous experience of projectors could shed a light.

Cheers Hugh...that was my initial though. But wouldn't they have two reels side by side?
 

Sabtr

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Bah those places must be stinking! Actually I think Scarborough stinks but that's my opinion!!

Good that you used some skillz and poked a lens through - yes it appears to be a big old projector. I'm unsure of the make and it does seem right out of place there.
I'll give you two internet points for the targets you've posted. :)
 

Dirus_Strictus

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HughieD;357861 But wouldn't they have two reels side by side?[/QUOTE said:
Your bog standard 35mm cinema projector. There was talk way, way back of somebody starting a 'cinema club' - possible this old and very cheap projector was going to be the starting point. When the larger format projectors for wide screen came in, you could not give these things away. Film always had to run straight through the gate; hence the two reels, one above the other - with no twisting of the film.
 

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